Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Introduction

Kam Louie

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

The many political and social upheavals of the second half of the twentieth century, such as the civil rights movement and protests against the war in Vietnam, resulted in a growing interest not only in class and race, but also in gender. In the Western world, this social phenomenon gave rise to gender studies as an academic discipline. ...

Part 1: Late Imperial Chinese Masculinity

read more

1. Polygamy and Masculinity in China: Past and Present

Harriet Zurndorfer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-33

In the late nineteenth century, polygamy—along with opium smoking and foot binding—came to represent China’s backwardness in the face of imperial encroachment and cultural denigration by foreign powers. China’s 1895 defeat in the Sino-Japanese War cast the image of the country as the “sick man of East Asia” (dongya bingfu 東亞病夫), ...

read more

2. The Manhood of a Pinshi (Poor Scholar): The Gendered Spaces in the Six Records of a Floating Life

Martin W. Huang

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-50

In Shen Fu’s 沈復 (b. 1763) much admired autobiography, Six Records of a Floating Life or Fusheng liuji 浮生六記 (hereafter shortened to Six Records), there is a curious passage about an incident in his childhood years in which the narrator recalls his obsession with various small insects and plants: ...

read more

3. Theater and the Text-Spatial Reproduction of Literati and Mercantile Masculinities in Nineteenth-Century Beijing

Mark Stevenson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 51-71

Backlit, two opera actors in full costume, one large and slightly ungainly, the other petite and holding a sword by his waist, walk forlornly through a hangar-sized doorway into an empty, dimly lit, and dusty rehearsal hall that doubles as a basketball court. Beijing, 1977, the screen tells us. ...

read more

4. The Plebification of Male-Love in Late Ming Fiction: The Forgotten Tales of Longing

Cuncun Wu

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-89

While there is a large and growing academic literature on the history of Chinese same-sex desire, both in Chinese and in Western languages,1 most of the discussion has centered on issues that either relate to what might be called the “legal” question of the status of homoerotic desire in Chinese history— ...

read more

5. Aestheticizing Masculinity in Honglou meng: Clothing, Dress, and Decoration

Louise Edwards

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-112

Men are not generally associated with “beauty” today; neither is masculinity commonly regarded as being manifest through elaborate beautification rituals or bodily displays of decoration. Such tasks are performed by women and are interpreted as expressions of their femininity. In China today, as elsewhere, if men are described as “beautiful,” ...

read more

6. Drawings of a Life of “Unparalleled Glory”: Ideal Manhood and the Rise of Pictorial Autobiographies in China

Binbin Yang

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-134

Hongxue yinyuan tuji 鴻雪因緣圖記 (Drawings of fleeting memories and karma, 1847), a nianpu 年譜 (chronological auto/biography) by the Manchu official Wanyan Linqing 完顏麟慶 (1791–1846), continues to stand out in the Chinese autobiographical tradition due to its novel form and visual impact (Feng 2005, 119–58; Moloughney 1992, 11).1 ...

Part 2: Chinese Masculinity Today

read more

7. Making Class and Gender: White-Collar Men in Postsocialist China

Derek Hird

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 137-156

Post-Mao marketization policies have produced complex transformations in men’s subjectivities, which, in turn, have contributed to configuring China’s postsocialist modernity in particular gendered, sexualized, and classed ways (Lu 2007). ...

read more

8. Corruption, Masculinity, and Jiangsu Ideology in the PRC

John Osburg

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-172

Recently, an entrepreneur I had met at a local gym invited me to visit a hot spring in a small city outside Chengdu. He was closely connected to some officials from the city where the hot spring was located, and they had offered to pay for our hotel, meals, and hot spring entrance fees. ...

read more

9. The Postsocialist Working Class: Male Heroes in Jia Zhangke’s Films

Sheldon Lu

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-185

Jia Zhangke’s (賈樟柯) films are renowned for their portrayal of ordinary Chinese people caught up in the historic yet troubled transition of China from a socialist planned economy to a capitalist market economy. Male heroes (or antiheroes) are central characters in Jia’s films. ...

read more

10. The Chinese Father: Masculinity, Conjugal Love, and Parental Involvement

Xuan Li, William Jankowiak

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 186-203

China’s “traditional” family dynamics have faced a series of major challenges since the beginning of the twentieth century.1 The relentless progression of social and political movements, from the New Culture Movement (Xin Wenhua Yundong 新文化運動) in the mid-1910s to the implementation of the Reform and Open policy (Gaige Kaifang 改革開放) since the late 1970s, ...

read more

11. All Dogs Deserve to Be Beaten: Negotiating Manhood and Nationhood in Chinese TV Dramas

Geng Song

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 204-219

The interconnection between nationalism and masculinity in Chinese popular culture has attracted scholarly attention in recent years (Song 2010; Song and Hird 2014). Nationalist sentiments and images of national heroes in the Chinese media have increasingly become distinctly Chinese characteristics of masculinity in the global age. ...

read more

12. The Anthropology of Chinese Masculinity in Taiwan and Hong Kong

Heung-wah Wong, Hoi-yan Yau

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 220-244

Janet was in her early twenties when we first met her in 2003. At our first interview, she suggested that she had stopped dating her boyfriend just because her waishengren (外省人 mainland Chinese) father rejected him as coming from a “farming family in the south whose parents are poorly educated,” studying at a “university with a poor reputation,” working in a “small local company,” and thus “not a good man.”2 ...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-250