Cover

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Title Page, Editorial Board, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Preface: Laying the Foundation

John W. White, PhD

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pp. xi-xiv

This volume was inspired by a conference held at the College of Charleston in June 2014. Many of the participants in that conference, “Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library,” are also contributors to this book; however, it is notable that the book is not the published proceedings of the conference. The essays compiled here are not simply expanded and refined versions of some of the conference...

Part 1: Why Digital Humanities in the Library?

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1. Recovering a Humanist Librarianship through Digital Humanities

Trevor Muñoz

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pp. 3-14

The many discussions—at conferences, on blogs, and in the professional literature—about how librarians can best engage with the digital humanities (DH) reveal a notable absence. The position of digital humanities work in many academic research libraries—as a service point for specialized consulting or training—suggests that DH is widely seen as external to the core functions of research...

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2. A History of History through the Lens of Our Digital Present, the Traditions That Shape and Constrain Data-Driven Historical Research, and What Librarians Can Do About It

James Baker

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pp. 15-32

Historians have a long and often fraught relationship with numbers. None other than the great French Annalist historian Fernand Braudel acknowledged in 1967 that his methods—temporal and spatial extrapolation of demographic data that enabled him to estimate undocumented population sizes, to grapple with history in the longue durée —were controversial. “Historians accustomed to accept only things proved...

Part 2: The Practice of Digital Humanities in the Library

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3. Digital Public History in the Library: Developing the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative at the College of Charleston

Mary Battle, Tyler Mobley, and Heather Gilbert

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pp. 35-58

In recent years, the growing availability of user-friendly, open-source digital tools has generated unprecedented opportunities for a range of cultural heritage institutions and scholars to participate in developing online exhibition projects. For many library, archival, museum, and academic institutions, digital exhibitions built through open-source tools have the ability to significantly enhance public...

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4. Curating Menus: Digesting Data for Critical Humanistic Inquiry

Katherine Rawson

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pp. 59-72

Beginning in 2011, people across the United States came to the What’s On the Menu? website and typed in snippets of text—names of dishes and prices on menus that ranged from the 1850s to the 2000s. They were working from images of menus digitized and held by the New York Public Library (NYPL). Out of curiosity, interest, or school assignment, these people were building a data set of over one million points...

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5. Many Voices, One Experiment: Building Toward Generous Interfaces for Oral History Collections with Mapping the Long Women’s Movement

Seth Kotch

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pp. 73-92

This chapter will address one approach to extending the archival model outside the library, as represented by the library’s online catalog, and into the more flexible and experimental space of digital humanities. Therefore, it is less digital humanities in the library, than digital humanities inspired by the library and done with the strengths and habits of the library in mind. It addresses Mapping the Long Women’s Movement,2 a project...

Part 3: Building Digital Humanities Infrastructure and Partnerships

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6. The Center That Holds: Developing Digital Publishing Initiatives at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship

Sarah Melton

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pp. 95-110

The Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS), formed in 2013, brought together several existing library units and programs: the Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC), the Electronic Data Center, the Lewis H. Beck Center for Electronic Collections, and the Emory Center for Interactive Teaching (ECIT). ECDS is tasked with “break[ing] down barriers” between these preexisting units and “simplify[ing] the process...

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7. Copiloting a Digital Humanities Center: A Critical Reflection on a Libraries–Academic Partnership

Brian Rosenblum and Arienne Dwyer

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pp. 111-126

The University of Kansas (KU) Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities (IDRH)1 was established in 2010 to provide resources and training in the practices and tools of the digital humanities, and to facilitate interdisciplinary academic collaborations and externally funded research. IDRH’s major programs include an annual digital humanities conference featuring workshops and scholarly research...

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8. Advancing Digital Humanities at CU-Boulder through Evidence-Based Service Design

Thea Lindquist, Holley Long, and Alexander Watkins

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pp. 127-148

In 2012, librarians at the University of Colorado Boulder became increasingly aware that interest in digital humanities was gaining ground on our campus. A growing number of graduate students, new faculty members, and established faculty members had been exposed to digital humanities tools and methodologies at disciplinary conferences and were asking questions about incorporating...

Part 4: Pedagogy and Instruction

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9. A Collaborative Approach to Urban Cultural Studies and Digital Humanities

Benjamin Fraser and Jolanda-Pieta van Arnhem

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pp. 151-178

This chapter will respond simultaneously to three different forces that are influencing the development of humanities research: (1) urban cultural studies, (2) the digital humanities, and (3) collaborative research and practice. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of each of these forces—and because of the need to work both at the theoretical and the practical levels here—each is introduced concisely...

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10. Fostering Assessment Strategies for Digital Pedagogy through Faculty–Librarian Collaborations: An Analysis of Student-Generated Multimodal Digital Scholarship

Harriett E. Green

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pp. 179-204

What kind of learning occurs when a student creates a digital video log (“vlog”) of interviews and integrates digital footage into their project narrative? How can we assess learning outcomes when a student tells a historical narrative via a website featuring content in five different media formats as well as text?...

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11. Library Instruction for Digital Humanities Pedagogy in Undergraduate Classes

Stewart Varner

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pp. 205-222

The term “digital humanities” describes a wide variety of scholarly activities. So wide, in fact, that it is increasingly difficult to use the term with any sort of precision. It is helpful, therefore, to think about digital humanities in terms of several subcategories.

• Online social networking,
• Text mining/data analysis,...

Index

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pp. 223-229