Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotation

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

I have written this book because the films of Theo Angelopoulos matter. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

Special thanks to Theo Angelopoulos for all of his help, support, cooperation, and long-term friendship. ...

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Introduction: The Voyage beyond the Borders

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pp. 3-22

It is a cool September evening in 1975 in Thessaloniki, Greece's second-largest city. A noisy standing-room-only crowd is packed into the major cinema of the annual Greek Film Festival. The lights dim and director Theo Angelopoulos's third feature film, The Travelling Players, begins. ...

Part One: Culture, History, Cinema

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pp. 23-24

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Chapter 1: Cinema and the Borders of Greek Culture

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pp. 25-54

One need not study Hitchcock's relationship to British culture to understand Rear Window or Psycho, or John Ford's Irish roots to appreciate Stagecoach or The Searchers. But some filmmakers, artists, and writers need to be understood in the context of their cultures if their works are to be appreciated on a more than superficial level. ...

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Chapter 2: The Moving Pattern of Images: Greek History and Individual Perspectives

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pp. 55-72

A group of actors walk through a town in northern Greece. The scene takes some ten minutes on the screen and is captured in a single tracking shot. But that is not all. At the beginning of the scene, it is 1952, and when the troupe reaches a taverna in the town, it is 1939: it is almost as if each minute of screen time takes them back a year in history. ...

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Chapter 3: Angelopoulos, the Continuous Image, and Cinema

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pp. 73-88

Angelopoulos's films suggest a concern with the form and potential of cinema itself. "Cinema has not yet been invented," Andre Bazin used to say in an effort to make viewers, filmmakers, and critics alike understand that far too many films have settled for too little in concept and execution. ...

Part Two: Five Films

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pp. 89-90

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Chapter 4: Reconstruction: “Help Me, I’m Lost”

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pp. 91-101

Reconstruction (1970), his first feature, offers a preview of Angelopoulos's films to follow. And yet it stands on its own as well, not only for its vivid black-and-white cinematography, but because it is his only film that places a woman at the center of the entire narrative ...

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Chapter 5: The Traveling Players: Figures in the Landscape of Myth and History

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pp. 102-126

Shakespeare's lines delivered in As You Like It have perhaps too often been quoted carelessly, but they have fresh currency when considered in relation to The Travelling Players and Angelopoulos's films in general: ...

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Chapter 6: Voyage to Cypher: “One ... Two ... Oh, My God. I’m Out of Step”

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pp. 127-143

Voyage to Cypher could be called Angelopoulos's version of Fellini's , that is, a director's self-reflexive meditation on the difficulties and joys of creating a film. Yet if we follow through on this parallel, we must begin with an awareness that Angelopoulos's film involves a filmmaker as Telemachus ...

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Chapter 7: Landscape in the Mist: A Documentary Fairy Tale

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pp. 144-160

Landscape in the Mist, which won the European "Oscar" (Felix) as Best Film of 1989, could be subtitled Children in a Documentary Fairy Tale. Quite simply, it is Angelopoulos's most accessible film. It forms the third part of what Angelopoulos has called a trilogy of silence, which can be identified loosely as a voyaging trilogy also comprising Voyage and The Beekeeper. ...

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Chapter 8: The Suspended Step of the Stork: “If I Take One More Step, I Will Be Somewhere Else”

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pp. 161-178

A young bearded journalist and a Greek army colonel stand on a bridge over a river that is the border between Greece and Albania. They wear coats to protect themselves against the gray dawn of a northern Greek winter day. The colonel points to a blue line and says that it is the end of Greece. ...

Part Three: Conclusions

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pp. 179-180

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Chapter 9: Ulysses’ Gaze: “We Are Dying People”

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pp. 181-201

At the end of Suspended Step, the young reporter is standing in Greece, by the border river, looking across to the other country where the politician played by Mastroianni has disappeared. In Ulysses, Gaze (1995), Angelopoulos crosses the border himself, literally and metaphorically, taking us, the viewers, with him. ...

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Conclusions: From the Cinematic Gaze to a Culture of Links

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pp. 202-210

Let us begin to conclude with Angelopoulos's own words. The following edited interview took place in Theo Angelopoulos's simple office in Athens, not far from the National Museum, during July 1993. At this point he was deeply into preproduction for his latest film, Ulysses' Gaze. No casting had yet been done. ...

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Afterword: The Pleasures of Eternity and a Day: “Life Is Sweet and ...”

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pp. 211-220

We hear the sea and observe an old house at dawn. Then a young boy's voice calls out, "Come, Alexander, we will go to the island and go diving to take a look at the ancient city." With such simplicity Angelopoulos begins his eleventh feature film, ...

Filmography

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pp. 221-226

Bibliography

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pp. 227-232

Index

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pp. 233-237