Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations and Tables

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

In contrast to most English-language scholarship on early modern Italy, this book focuses on the Republic of Genoa. British and American works have tended to give pride of place to the republics of Florence and Venice, often to some aspect of the former’s turbulence and its transformation into an “absolutist” state in the sixteenth century...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

Unfortunately there is not enough room to thank all of the people who have contributed to the completion of this book, but I do feel compelled to mention the considerable help, criticism, and patience offered by Kirti Chaudhuri and Franco Angiolini, as well as the valuable suggestions and archival references given by Rodolfo Savelli. I would also like to thank...

Map of The Western Mediterranean

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pp. 1-2

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Chapter One. The Republic Genoa in the Early Modern World

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pp. 3-28

Genoa faces the sea. Hemmed in on all sides by steep hills and mountains, the city is an amphitheater centered around the watery stage of its circular port. The rivers Bisagno and Polcevera reach the sea immediately to the east and west of Genoa, respectively, providing a natural boundary for the city’s growth along the coast, in effect limiting it to the area...

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Chapter Two. The Genoese and the Republic of Genoa

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pp. 29-50

The “century of the Genoese,” long neglected by historians, still lacks a specific time frame; disagreement persists as to just when that “century” began and when it ended.1 The 1550s have been suggested as the starting point for Genoese supremacy in European finance and for Genoese influence in European affairs in general. Indeed, during that decade...

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Chapter Three. Public Galleys and Private Interests, 1559–1607

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pp. 51-83

Having sketched out a broad outline of the Republic of Genoa’s sixteenth-century political and economic context, we now shift our attention to an analysis of the more dynamic elements of Genoese politics and, in particular, to those events and trends that shaped the republic’s maritime policy. The development of such policy, one of the principal points of encounter...

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Chapter Four. Diplomacy and the Rearmament Debate: The Weight of the Spanish Alliance, 1607–1640

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pp. 84-116

The first decade of the seventeenth century marked the beginning of a period of transition in the history of the Republic of Genoa. Disagreement over questions of sovereignty, various diplomatic incidents, and growing resentment of the overbearing manner with which the Spanish often interfered with the republic’s internal questions all indicate that the once solid alliance between Genoa...

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Chapter Five. The Lure of the World’s Seas, 1640–1680

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pp. 117-150

Two years after the Compagnia di nostra signora di libertà had folded, the Republic of Genoa officially adopted the idea of increasing the size of its galley fleet through the use of ships manned by free oarsmen.2 To a large degree the about-face in the republic’s position was the result of an ever-increasing aggressiveness on the part of France. In 1639 the French had captured...

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Chapter Six. Galleons, Galleys, and the Free Port: Ships and Power in a Little Country

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pp. 151-185

Despite the increasing distance between Genoa’s oligarchs and the direct experience of maritime commerce during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, members of the ruling class sought to revive the republic’s medieval maritime tradition, hoping to recapture the influence and commercial might that the city-state had enjoyed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries...

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Chapter Seven. Conclusion: A Century of Ships and Paper

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pp. 186-202

Two threads run intertwined through Genoese political discourse during the latter half of the sixteenth and the better part of the seventeenth century, passing through a century and a half of political formations and economic transformations. Both ideas—relaunching Genoa as a maritime power (for many as a maritime military power), and creating an emporium market...

Appendix A. Operating Costs of “Free Galleys,” 1646

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p. 203

Appendix B. Breakdown of Annual Operating Expenses of a Mixed-Crew Galley, 1652

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pp. 204-208

Notes

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pp. 209-256

Bibliography

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pp. 257-268

Index

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pp. 269-276