Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xviii

Any effort to transcend the substance and banality that characterize human history must have failings, or even be variously false, but some efforts have a greater usefulness than others. That constitutes the challenge of the 1993 Coleman B. Ransone Lectures: to get a running head start toward dealing with diversity in organizations. Can the details be transcended in the real...

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1. Circumscribing Diversity: Orientations at the Organizational Level of Analysis

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pp. 1-24

Rather than circumscribing diversity, let alone defining it, many academic observers prefer to waffle or even to avoid the matter altogether. No doubt about it, diversity issues constitute a whole panoply of today's tar babies. Hence the academic literature is both sparse and underwhelming.
These 1993 Coleman B. Ransone Lectures do not have that option...

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2. Five Developmental Emphases in Diversity: The Past Can Be Prologue to the Future, If We Pay Attention

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pp. 25-50

This chapter rests on a truism: if we do not understand our history, we will be doomed to doing it over and perhaps even more poorly than the first time. This is always wasteful, but today it may be tragic and perhaps even catastrophic. To put it bluntly, no one can confidently predict what will happen if we do not make constructive adaptations to the differentiating forces all around...

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3. A, Maybe The, Reason Why Most Systems Are Diversity-Unfriendly: Bureaucratic Structures as Barriers

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pp. 51-88

This chapter rests on the basic assumption that among the most important things about virtually any arena are how it is organized and managed. As Jay R. Galbraith and Edward E. Lawler put the point, unequivocally (1993, p. 3): "Ultimately, there may be no long-term sustainable advantage except the ability to organize and manage." It could hardly be different for diversity...

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4. Moving toward Diversity-Friendly Systems, I: Attractions of an Alternative Structure

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pp. 89-132

Well-known structural arrangements can accommodate diversity far better than does the bureaucratic model, and even the single illustration here makes the point adequately, for several reasons. Most important, the alternative model used here has a substantial and growing presence. Indeed, of all non bureaucratic variants, this exemplar is the most...

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5. Moving toward Diversity-Friendly Systems, II: Aspects of an Affirming Infrastructure

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pp. 133-174

As the two previous chapters reflect, developing a managerial approach to diversity does not have to be a case of virtue being its own reward. Far from it, in matters great and small, diversity has long had its compensating and even rewarding features.
I vividly recall a day in the early 1970S when I was working with government...

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6. A Temporary Concluding, but No Conclusion

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pp. 175-189

This is enough about structure and infrastructure for now. Perhaps even too much.
In any case, my strong sense is that this is not the end of valuing or managing diversity. Rather, it seems far more like the end of a beginning, with long and numerous ways to go. Indeed, if ever a book deserved to end indeterminately...

References

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pp. 190-208

Index

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pp. 209-216

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About the Author

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p. 217

Robert T. Golembiewski is Research Professor of Political Science at the University of Georgia. He received his bachelor's degree from Princeton and his master's and doctorate from Yale. He has written or edited more than 50 books, the latest of which is Practical Public Management. He also has published...