Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface to the Paperback Edition

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pp. vii-viii

This paperback edition of Kazantzakis: Politics of the Spirit, Volume 1, is meant to accompany the newly published second volume, enabling a reader to survey the entire extent of Kazantzakis’s creative life. I have not made any substantive changes to the text even though certain sections, if I had written them now, would have been different. In discussing Askitikí, for example...

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

This is the first part of a projected two-volume study. It takes us from the start of Kazantzakis's career in 1906 to the publication of his epic Odyssey in 1938, when he was fifty-five years old. He still had nineteen years to live. Works composed after the Odyssey—including the novels that brought him international fame—will be considered in the second...

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A Note on Documentation and Transliteration

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pp. xiii-xiv

Abbreviations in the parenthetical references are limited to four: "Kaz." for Nik.os Kazantzakis, "Eleni Kaz." for Eleni N. Kazantzaki (or Helen Kazantzakis or Eleni Samios), "Prev." for Pandelfs Prevelakis, and "Od." for Odyssey. Full bibliographical data for all works quoted, consulted, and mentioned are given in the alphabetical listing of...

List of Works

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pp. xv-xviii

Chronology

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pp. xix-xxvi

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Chapter One. Why Kazantzakis Is Not a Political Writer

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pp. 3-22

No author who lives in Greece can avoid politics. But it is one thing for a writer to be personally interested in governmental affairs and quite another for him to be truly political. By this I mean someone whose basic concerns are societal: who focuses on how human beings rule themselves so that they may live harmoniously together and prosper...

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Chapter Two. Philosophical Studies in Paris

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pp. 23-54

Before moving ahead to consider the breakup of Kazantzakis's nationalism and the development of his "communism" and metacommunism, we must stop to examine his studies in Paris, for these, although not always directly political, governed his future thinking in all areas. He concentrated on three philosophers, William James, Friedrich Nietzsche...

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Chapter Three. Development of Kazantzakis's (Meta-)Communism

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pp. 55-78

Kazantzakis's next phase after the breakup of his nationalism was a similar foray into politics followed, as before, by disillusion and withdrawal. The difference this time was that international communism replaced ethnocentric Hellenism.
We have seen that he dated his new allegiance from 1923...

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Chapter Four. The Irálkion Incident and the Odyssey's First Draft

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pp. 79-98

Having completed his metacommunistic credo, Kazantzakis thirsted to apply his doctrine. But the question was how and where. In Berlin, the few who listened to his preaching were Russians and Poles, not Greeks (Kaz. 1958a:I2I; 1979a:73). We have seen that he dispatched Askitikí to the Soviet Union; although he claimed to have no illusions...

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Chapter Five. Russia

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pp. 99-156

The years between the first draft of the Odyssey's initial cantos in 1925 and the epic's reworking during the winter of 1929-1930 constitute a new cycle in Kazantzakis's life, one that repeats the previous pattern whereby artistic and philosophical endeavors at the desk give way to political endeavors in the marketplace, then to disillusion, and lastly to the...

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Chapter Six. Toda-Raba and the Waning of Kazantzakis's Communism

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pp. 157-184

Kazantzakis left Moscow on 16 April 1929. He reached Berlin on 20 April and remained there for less than three weeks (Prev. 1965b: 122, 125). As always, he was exhilarated by change. Berlin struck him anew as one of the "most interesting cities in the world," especially because of the efforts of intellectuals there to synthesize the bourgeois and communist...

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Chapter Seven. Aesthetic Freedom

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pp. 185-190

The term freedom as used by Kazantzakis is a pomegranate showering us with innumerable seeds when we split it open. Most basically, freedom is the condition of a creative soul expressing itself. But to understand this concept more fully we must also consider the seeds that it throws out. This means reviewing Kazantzakis's notions of the transitional...

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Chapter Eight. Odyssey

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pp. 191-240

I have already said many of the important things I wish to say about Kazantzakis's Odíssia. I have done this deliberately throughout the preceding chapters in order to prepare the reader gradually, orienting him or her in advance by means of scattered references, because the Odyssey is too huge to be confronted all at once. Now that we are finally ready...

Notes

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pp. 241-286

References

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pp. 287-310

Index

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pp. 311-318