Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

This volume represents the research and work of numerous people down the years, many of whom will not be mentioned individually. Our especial heartfelt thanks go to all descendants who braved coming to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to attend and contribute their thoughts and voices to discussions about Carlisle and other Indian boarding schools at the 2012 symposium. ...

read more

Introduction

Jacqueline Fear-Segal, Susan D. Rose

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-34

Close to midnight on October 5, 1879, a train drew into the railroad station in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, carrying eighty-two Lakota children from the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Indian Agencies in Dakota Territory. They were the first contingent of students sent to the newly opened Carlisle Indian School to be made the subjects of an educational experiment ...

read more

Welcome, with Seneca Thanksgiving Prayer “We Are One”

Peter Jemison (Seneca)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-40

We gather here today to honor those who have come before us and to acknowledge those who will come behind us, to recognize and honor those around us and beside us. We give thanks to the elders who have traveled far to be with us and to share their wisdom. ...

Part 1. A Sacred and Storied Place

read more

1. The Stones at Carlisle

N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-53

Some of the stones bear no names. They are the tombs of the unknown children, those who died here between 1879 and 1918 during the tenure of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. They were American Indian children, and they came from far away, from places with American names—Piqua, Chinle, Tahlequah, Bimidji, Nespelem, Oraibi. ...

read more

2. Before Carlisle: The Lower Susquehanna Valley as Contested Native Space

Christopher J. Bilodeau

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-80

The establishment of Carlisle’s infamous Indian School in 1879 ushered in a new era in Indian white relations in the mid Atlantic region. But Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and its surrounding area has a deep Native history, as archaeological research shows that Indians lived in the Susquehanna River Valley for at least eleven thousand years before the influx of European settlers.1 ...

Part 2. Student Lives and Losses

3. Photograph: Carlisle Poem—Who Is This Boy?

Maurice Kenny (Mohawk)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-87

read more

4. The Names

Barbara Landis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-105

As I stand at the podium, speech at hand, ready to introduce two people who have worked closely with me in my endeavors to get the Carlisle Indian School student enrollment names to the Native nations, I look out into the audience and suddenly realize I can’t speak. I am looking into the eyes of all those descendants with whom I’ve been emailing for twenty years without meeting them, and now they are real. ...

read more

5. White Power and the Performance of Assimilation: Lincoln Institute and Carlisle Indian School

Louellyn White (Mohawk)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 106-123

The connection between my family’s story and the Carlisle Indian School’s history drew me to the Carlisle Symposium. My paternal grandfather, Mitchell Aronhiawakon White, was born in 1889 on the Akwesasne (St. Regis) Mohawk reserve and died in 1975.1 I have fond memories of sitting on his lap while he played a harmonica, tapping his feet to the music. ...

read more

6. The Imperial Gridiron: Dealing with the Legacy of Carlisle Indian School Sports

John Bloom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 124-138

A longtime mentor and scholar who pioneered critical work on the Carlisle Indian School once said that it was her goal to write a history of the institution that never once mentioned Jim Thorpe.1 Such sentiments are entirely understandable. Thorpe’s iconic memory represents a larger history of sports at the institution, and Carlisle Indian School sports have driven the institution’s public narrative for over a century. ...

7. Waste

Maurice Kenny (Mohawk)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-142

Part 3. Carlisle Indian School Cemetery

8. Cementerio indio

Eduardo Jordá

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-151

read more

9. The History and Reclamation of a Sacred Space: The Indian School Cemetery

Jacqueline Fear-Segal

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 152-184

Today it is still possible to visit the Carlisle Indian School cemetery, walk between the stones, and read the names on nearly two hundred identical markers standing in six, neat rows. Small and well kept, this rectangular graveyard looks like a military cemetery, except for the Indian names on the stones. ...

read more

10. Death at Carlisle: Naming the Unknowns in the Cemetery

Barbara Landis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-198

When I first saw the cemetery at Carlisle, filled with rows of children’s graves, I noticed that thirteen of them were marked with the same worrying and uninformative word: “Unknown.” Who were these children, I wondered. Where did they come from? What were their names? ...

Part 4. Reclamations

read more

11. The Lost Ones: Piecing Together the Story

Jacqueline Fear-Segal

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-232

Col. Ranald Slidell Mackenzie’s ferocious 1873 attack on three large Lipan Apache, Mescalero Apache, and Kickapoo villages inside the Mexican border near Remolino left many Native people dead. Two Lipan Apache children were captured, made prisoners of war, and later transported across the continent, from Texas to Pennsylvania, to be enrolled at the Carlisle Indian School. ...

read more

12. Necropolitics, Carlisle Indian School, and Ndé Memory

Margo Tamez (Ndé/Lipan Apache)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-257

I bear witness to Ndé (Lipan Apache) experiences before our elders and traditional leaders, as well as the supportive academic community. In our collective effort to confront and address the history of Carlisle Indian School (CIS), we must also come to grips with a shared history of genocidal violence and the continuing impact of ignorance and denial in the United States, ...

read more

13. Sacred Journey: Restoring My Plains Indian Tipi

Carolyn Rittenhouse (Lakota

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 258-273

Although I was born in 1967 and my childhood years were lived in the final quarter of the twentieth century, I too was subjected to an educational program whose goals were in line with the Carlisle Indian School’s and with Richard Henry Pratt’s motto: “Kill the Indian and Save the Man.” ...

read more

14. Carlisle Farmhouse: A Major Site of Memory

Carolyn Tolman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 274-290

On a forgotten corner of the grounds of the U.S. Army War College, in south central Pennsylvania, an old whitewashed brick farmhouse peeks through towering spruces. Although surrounded by the bustle of a modern army post, it sits peacefully secluded behind mature trees and lawn, overlooking a large spring. ...

Part 5. Revisioning the Past

read more

15. Research Note on the Carlisle Indian Industrial School Digital Humanities Project

Malinda Triller Doran

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-295

More than 10,500 students attended the Carlisle Indian School (CIS) between 1879 and 1918, and each one of them has a story. As has been made clear in this collection, most of these stories are yet to be told, and researching any one of them is a challenge. ...

read more

16. Carlisle Indian Industrial School: Projects for Teaching

Paul Brawdy, Anne-Claire Fisher

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 296-312

Public education in the United States, represented by schools across the country, stands as a paradox of public life. As a reminder of both the promise and shortcomings of the social, political, and economic forces shaping society, the American system of public education seems to at once prepare its citizens for an aspirational, self-governing, mobile society ...

Part 6. Reflections and Responses

read more

17. The Spirit Survives

Dovie Thomason (Lakota and Kiowa Apache)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 315-332

They tell me it was cold that late August day, now almost ten years ago. They tell me it was cold; but that’s not what I remember about the day. I remember my daughter, because we were standing in a cemetery. ...

read more

18. Response to Visiting Carlisle: Experiencing Intergenerational Trauma

Warren Petoskey (Odawa and Lakota)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 333-336

In October 2012 my wife and I accompanied a group to the Carlisle School Symposium at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The subject matter of the symposium centered on the infamous Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879 and closed in 1918. ...

read more

19. The Presence of Ghosts

Maurice Kenny (Mohawk)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 337-340

I saw the light from the street. The window was white. I shuddered, but I was bound to enter this historic old house in Carlisle, the Guest House at Dickinson College where I was meant to stay. But I sensed the presence of ghosts. So we left the old Guest House. ...

read more

20. A Sacred Space

Sharon O’Brien

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-343

This was the most extraordinary symposium I’ve ever attended. Because of the non-academic, Native structure and sessions, mingling stories with poems with videos with papers with the most heartfelt audience response I’ve ever seen, this symposium engaged us all as whole people—mind, heart, and spirit. ...

read more

21. Carlisle: My Hometown

Charles Fox

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 344-351

From 1996 through 1998 I used to bring my family back to Carlisle to escape from our urban setting of Philadelphia and allow my own sons to revel in the outdoor pleasures I had known as a child. On an evening of one such trip, the hour of midnight had passed, and a frigid December night had produced a particularly clear sky. ...

read more

22. The Ndé and Carlisle: Reflections on the Symposium

Daniel Castro Romero Jr. (Nd./Lipan Apache)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 352-354

The Carlisle Symposium opened up a space for us to tell our story, to say we are not extinct—we are still here. It was a healing time—we faced the past, integrated it—we had to do that in order to move forward as a people. It was important to share the stories of our people. ...

read more

Epilogue

N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 355-356

The Carlisle Indian Industrial School is a landmark in the cultural history of the United States. In the years of its existence, 1879–1918, the nation was in an ambiguous state of being. The Civil War left a festering wound on the moral and patriotic intelligence of most Americans. ...

Chronology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 357-362

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 363-372

Published Resources for Researching the Carlisle Indian Industrial School

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 373-376

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 377-382

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 383-398

Further Series Titles

pdf iconDownload PDF