Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xii

The idea for this book originated during Women’s History Month in 2010, when a few colleagues and I working in the department of education at Mayo Clinic collaborated to create a Jeopardy game based on women from Mayo’s past. When I visited the Mayo Clinic Historical Suite, I expected to find information on the few women I knew had been a part of the clinic’s history. ...

Note on Names

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pp. xiii-xiv

Part One: Unlikely Beginning

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Chapter 1. Disaster Strikes, August 21, 1883

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pp. 5-12

More than a million patients from all fifty states and 143 countries arrive at the doors of Mayo Clinic every year seeking treatment for routine and life-threatening diseases. Facilities in six states with more than 4,000 physicians and scientists and 52,000 nurses and allied health staff collaborate to care for patients and assure that “the needs of the patient come first.”1 ...

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Chapter 2. Arriving in Pioneer Rochester, 1851-1883

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pp. 13-28

Four women boldly found their way to Rochester in the mid- to late 1800s, when the town consisted of a few hotels, stores, churches, and saloons. Trains from the East Coast came only as far as Ohio, leaving prairie schooners, stagecoaches, and boats as the primary options of transportation into town. ...

Part Two: Women and the Early Medical Practice

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Chapter 3. Opening Saint Marys Hospital, 1889-1897

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pp. 31-60

After Louise Wright Mayo and her family arrived in Rochester and the cyclone devastated the town, Mother Alfred and the Sisters of Saint Francis worked long and hard to earn enough money to open a hospital. But Mother Alfred’s story does not begin there. Her journey, and that of her blood sister, Sister Barbara, originated many years before, across the Atlantic Ocean in Luxembourg. ...

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Chapter 4. Building the Practice, 1898-1906

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pp. 61-78

After Saint Marys Hospital opened and was staffed by six Sisters of Saint Francis and Edith Graham, a formally educated nurse, the Mayo doctors began bringing other physicians into the practice. The third physician they added was a woman. Prior to inviting her to join them, they had collaborated with numerous women physicians who were practicing locally. ...

Part Three: Steady Expansion

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Chapter 5. Reaching Around the Globe, 1907-1913

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pp. 81-100

The Mayo practice was no longer a doctor’s office just for the people in Rochester and the surrounding areas. The Mayos and their colleagues began drawing patients from greater distances as their reputation grew. Physicians from around the country visited to see what the Mayos were doing so successfully. As the practice expanded, more women were added in a wide range of positions, ...

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Chapter 6. The Needs of the Patient Come First, 1914-1919

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pp. 101-124

As the Mayo practice grew and evolved into a clinic dedicated to the best interests of the patient, women were involved in nearly every aspect. They led innovative clinical and research initiatives. Some of their roles—for example, as artists—were extraordinarily unique. And they applied their skills in unconventional settings outside of the clinic and Rochester, ...

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Chapter 7. Extending the Long Arm of the Physician, 1920-1926

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pp. 125-140

In addition to directly providing medical care, women started new services to more holistically meet the needs of the patients and their families. They learned from what others were doing at other medical centers throughout the nation and quickly built upon the ideas, applying them to patient care delivery at Mayo Clinic and its related hospitals, which continued to grow. ...

Part Four: Challenges and Changes

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Chapter 8. Meeting the Expanding Needs, 1922-1927

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pp. 143-162

The steady increase in patients required expanded facilities, especially in the number of hospital beds and surgical suites. The Sisters of Saint Francis, with Sister Joseph at the helm, repeatedly rose to the occasion. Additional formally educated nurses were also required to staff the expansions, and nursing schools were opened to meet the need. ...

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Chapter 9. Changing the Guard, 1928-1943

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pp. 163-184

A new grand Mayo Clinic building opened after more than forty years of growth—but just before the inception of the Great Depression. The years that followed were challenging economically, politically, and personally. And yet, the women and men of Mayo Clinic and Saint Marys Hospital persevered even as the founders lessened their presence and eventually died, ...

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Afterword: The Legacy

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pp. 185-188

Mayo Clinic continued to grow after Edith Graham Mayo died in 1943. The number of patients coming to Rochester increased from the temporary dip to 43,000 during the Depression to 400,000 in 2015. Since the days of the founders, Mayo Clinic has opened and affiliated with seventy-two community practices across the Midwest and opened substantial medical centers in Arizona and Florida. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 188-190

I am indebted to a long list of family, friends, and colleagues who supported me for four years and endured listening to my stories and excitement as I uncovered these women’s stories. ...

Appendix: Frequently Mentioned Women

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pp. 191-192

Notes

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pp. 193-208

Index

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pp. 209-218

Picture Credits

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p. 218

Back Cover

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