Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xx

Scott’s Shadow explores the distinctive literary field that flourished in Edinburgh between 1802, the year of the founding of the Edinburgh Review, and 1832, the year of the Reform Bill and the death of Sir Walter Scott. In those decades Scottish publications and genres dominated a globalizing English-language market and made Edinburgh a literary metropolis to rival London. ...

Part I

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Chapter 1. Edinburgh, Capital of the Nineteenth Century

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pp. 3-45

In the early afternoon of 14 August 1822, the yacht The Royal George with its naval and civilian escort cast anchor off the Edinburgh port of Leith. Heavy rain postponed the King’s landing until the following day. ...

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Chapter 2. The Invention of National Culture

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pp. 46-69

The historicizing retrospect of the post-Enlightenment, defining the present through reflection on the recent past, informs not only the Scottish novels of national history and manners and the attention paid to antiquarian and biographical “remains” in the Edinburgh periodicals but also a distinctive genre of cultural memoir. ...

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Chapter 3. Economies of National Character

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pp. 70-95

“National” difference is put to work, formally and ideologically, in the first Scottish novel published in Edinburgh, Elizabeth Hamilton’s The Cottagers of Glenburnie (1808).1 The Cottagers of Glenburnie specifies its Scottish setting with the protoethnographic rhetoric of a “thick description” that particularizes regional manners, dialect, and household objects. ...

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Chapter 4. Modernity’s Other Worlds

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pp. 96-115

The Highland piper on the banks of the Tweed: in Peter’s Letters to His Kinsfolk Lockhart follows Scott’s own adaptation of the tropes of “picturesque tourism” to represent national manners to a modern reading public.1 Contemporaries picked up on the association between Scott’s fiction and an ascendant tourist industry. ...

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Chapter 5. The Rise of Fiction

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pp. 116-144

National character is not to be found in London. The novels discussed in chapter 3 set the thick description of regional manners in Ireland or Scotland against the moral vacancy of “fashionable life.” For David Hume, a characterological blankness at the metropolitan core signified the gloss of plenty rather than the gape of lack, in England’s achievement of liberty and a mixed constitution: ...

Part II

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Chapter 6. Hogg’s Body

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pp. 147-182

One of the set pieces in Peter’s Letters to His Kinsfolk is provided by the second triennial Burns dinner held in Edinburgh on 22 February 1819. Complaining that Burns has become a hostage of the Whig literati, Dr. Morris sets out to rescue him for the Blackwood’s camp. ...

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Chapter 7. The Upright Corpse

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pp. 183-214

“Dear Sir Walter,” Hogg boasts, “ye can never suppose that I belang to your school o’ chivalry? Ye are the king o’ that school but I’m the king o’ the mountain an’ fairy school which is a far higher ane nor yours.”1 As both authors’ careers took them beyond Border minstrelsy Hogg could disdain the cool medium of antiquarian historicism preferred by his rival: ...

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Chapter 8. Theoretical Histories of Society

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pp. 215-245

John Galt, the other major talent among the Blackwoodians besides James Hogg, also found himself having to reckon with the ascendancy of the Waverley novels. One way of setting limits to Scott’s influence was to identify his work with a stock-in-trade of literary convention, into which Galt’s own practice sometimes lapsed by default. ...

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Chapter 9. Authenticity Effects

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pp. 246-286

Reflecting upon its own procedures, and upon the materials, contexts, and preoccupations of Scott’s art, The Antiquary highlights the retrospective station it occupies at the end of a trilogy of novels on the making of modern Scotland. The retrospective and self-reflexive stance is resumed with still greater virtuosity in Redgauntlet, ...

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Chapter 10. A New Spirit of the Age

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pp. 287-310

In 1826 readers were puzzled, amused, and instructed by a new publication called The Cook and Housewife’s Manual; Containing the Most Approved Modern Receipts for Making Soups, Gravies, Sauces, Ragouts and Made-dishes—puzzled, as well as amused and instructed, because the self-styled cookery book begins by posing as a sequel to a recent novel by the Author of Waverley. ...

Notes

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pp. 311-348

Bibliography

Early Nineteenth-Century Periodicals

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p. 349

Sources Published before 1900

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pp. 349-356

Sources Published after 1900

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pp. 356-374

Index

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pp. 375-387