Front Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Maps, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

This book, like many such projects, is not the result of work done in isolation. It evolved with the help and support of many people. I owe great thanks to Noreen Ambrose, formerly general counsel for the Port of San Francisco and ever guardian of its history, and to Diane Oshima, the Assistant Deputy Director of Waterfront Planning, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-20

In 1958, Matson Line’s Hawaiian Merchant was the first container ship to leave San Francisco Bay and head for open seas. As it slipped past the Golden Gate Bridge, few recognized that its voyage heralded a dramatic change in course for San Francisco’s storied waterfront. ...

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1. Oceans Apart: The San Francisco Waterfront Now and Then

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pp. 21-53

Waterfronts are complex places, and San Francisco’s is no exception. Its scale is large enough that to form a mental picture of its entirety can be difficult. And because the waterfront is used in many different ways, it can be a challenge to conceptualize in an ordered fashion. So, our inquiry begins with the key question: What kind of place is San Francisco’s waterfront? ...

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2. A Sea Change

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pp. 54-93

Ports thrive on flows, especially the movement of goods and nowadays, tourists and consumers. Shifts in flows can have severe consequences for a port, such as when shipping lanes are redirected or when the flow of capital for infrastructure improvements is restricted. ...

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3. In the Absence of Plans: Grand Schemes of the 1950s and 1960s

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pp. 94-131

The port of the 1950s was on the verge of becoming a cargo backwater. Yet Magnin and the port authority were in control of one of the most famous and evocative waterfronts in the world.1 So, even while the port wrestled with how to maintain cargo operations, it began to reimagine itself. ...

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4. Don’t Fill Me In: The Rise of Regulation and the Decline of Modernist Visions

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pp. 132-160

The Transamerica Pyramid is probably San Francisco’s most iconic building. While now it is a symbol of the city’s cultural and economic place on the world stage, its construction in 1969 represented something more immediate—a victory for downtown development machinery and a defeat for emergent anti-growth forces. ...

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5. In Local Hands: New Pressures of the 1970s

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pp. 161-177

That the port had become a new city agency was a relatively straightforward change that had no immediate impact on the life of the average San Franciscan, other than to elicit a sense of pride of place perhaps. The transfer represented a shift in bureaucratic domains of only limited meaningfulness to most, and certainly there were no outward changes. ...

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6. The Best Laid Plans

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pp. 178-206

Planning, as the apothegm of practitioners goes, is best done in a down cycle. The idea is simple: when the economy is stuttering along there is less pressure on land markets and the flow of building permits eases. This means, theoretically at least, that planners have more breathing room to consider new policy or to implement new zoning. ...

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7. Questionable Results: The Northern Waterfront in the 1970s and 1980s

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pp. 207-246

Despite the stifled atmosphere created by the port’s new situation and the policies and regulations that helped create it, pressure to develop port property had not eased. To pursue commercial development on the northern waterfront was a fundamental necessity. ...

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8. A Waterfront Planned: The 1990s and the New Millennium

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pp. 247-268

Our story now returns close to where we started, with San Francisco’s contemporary waterfront. Much of what one encounters when strolling along Herb Caen Way and the Embarcadero was ushered in by an earthquake, a new planning policy and regulatory regime, and new approaches to public-sector financing. ...

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9. Whose Waterfront?

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pp. 269-328

At the start of the book it was noted that the story of San Francisco was the story of its waterfront. These days, however, one could also assert that the story of the waterfront is the story of San Francisco. What has been happening to the city over the last decade or two is pressing hard along the bay. ...

Notes

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pp. 329-376

Index

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pp. 377-400

Back Cover

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