Front Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedications

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pp. i-vi

CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. ix-xii

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INTRODUCTION

Sara Castro-Klarén

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pp. 3-19

The central idea for this volume on the seminal Royal Commentaries of the Incas and General History of Peru (1609) by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (1539–1616) is to bring together, in a single volume in English, key essays authored by some of the most distinguished students of Inca Garcilaso’s work. Thus far, most of the book-length scholarship on Inca Garcilaso’s work has been published in Spanish, with the notable exception of John Grier Varner’s El Inca: The Life and Times of Garcilaso de la Vega (1968) and...

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INCA GARCILASO’S BIOGRAPHY

Christian Fernández

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pp. 20-32

Francisco Pizarro and his men conquered the Inca Empire in 1533. The Spanish encountered Atahualpa, the reigning Inca in Cajamarca and, after putting him in chains, garroted him. In 1534, Captain Garcilaso de la Vega y Vargas arrived in Peru with the expedition of Pedro de Alvarado, and after Alvarado left for Guatemala, Garcilaso, who stayed in Peru, was sent by Pizarro to conquer new lands. He was recalled to Lima to help Pizarro after the Manco Inca rebellion...

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1. RHETORIC AND POLITICS: Transatlantic Images and Paratexts in the Royal Commentaries

Christian Fernández

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pp. 33-61

Studies on Inca Garcilaso have paid little attention to the coat of arms that appears in the frontispiece of the first edition of the Royal Commentaries (1609).1 Indeed, this is so much the case that most modern editions do not even include a reproduction of it.2 I argue here that the analysis of the symbols represented in Garcilaso’s heraldic insignia is of the utmost importance for an interpretation of this work. Those same symbols are extremely relevant for an interpretation...

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2. A SYNCRETIC TROPOLOGY: Semantic and Symbolic Aspects of the Royal Commentaries

José Antonio Mazzotti

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pp. 62-128

This analysis of Garcilaso’s Royal Commentaries offers an alternative reading of the text, based on the confluence and superimposition of Andean and European discourses—at times coincident, at times counterpoised.1 Such a reading advances the outlines of a colonial writing subject who manifests himself through a discourse that is in and of itself a palimpsest. Just like the worn parchment with its many layers of writing, this multilayered discourse implies a simultaneity of positions...

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3. THE DISSEMINATION AND READING OF THE ROYAL COMMENTARIES IN THE PERUVIAN VICEROYALTY

Pedro M. Guibovich Pérez

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pp. 129-153

Read, glossed, cited, and paraphrased, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega’s Royal Commentaries (1609) have enjoyed enormous acclaim from readers since their first appearance at the beginning of the seventeenth century.1 The existence of numerous translations into most modern languages proves their success in Europe. Several factors explain this fact: the socioethnic background of the author, the literary quality of the work, the nature of the sources consulted for its composition, and the fact...

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4. TRANSLATION AND WRITING IN THE WORK OF INCA GARCILASO DE LA VEGA

Susana Jákfalvi-Leiva
Translated by Lautaro E. Leiva and Wendy P. Leiva

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pp. 154-173

DIRECTIONS AND DIVERGENCES AROUND INCA GARCILASO DE LA VEGA

Until the end of the nineteenth century, the work of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Cusco 1539–Córdoba 1616) was considered to be the definitive work of reference for studying the history of the Incario.1 The discovery of new documents and the publication of chronicles unknown in the first decades of the twentieth century illuminated...

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5. “MESTIZO . . . ME LO LLAMO YO A BOCA LLENA Y ME HONRO CON ÉL”: Race in Inca Garcilaso’s Royal Commentaries of the Incas and General History of Peru

Margarita Zamora

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pp. 174-194

Readers of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega’s Royal Commentaries of the Incas will remember the provocative chapter “Nombres nuevos para nombrar diversas generaciones” (Book IX, Chapter XXXI), where the author comments on the term mestizo.1 It is the final one in the group of sixteen consecutive chapters describing things that did not exist in Peru before the arrival of the Spanish.2 The heart of the chapter is Garcilaso’s affirmation of his racial hybridity, but the larger question of race...

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6. “FOR IT IS BUT A SINGLE WORLD”: Marsilio Ficino and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega in Dialogue with Pagan Philosophies

Sara Castro-Klarén

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pp. 195-228

One of the objectives of this chapter is to try to assess not only the survival of the Royal Commentaries (1609) as a text for our day, but also to advance the notion that Garcilaso’s ability to appeal to different readerships throughout the centuries, and perhaps in the future, is grounded in the strategies of translation and commentary that Garcilaso detected in the work of Marsilio Ficino (1433–99), Plato’s Renaissance translator and commentator.1 Another point argues that...

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7. WRITING THE HISTORY OF AN ANDEAN GHOST

Francisco A. Ortega Martínez

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pp. 229-259

Garcilaso de la Vega’s The Royal Commentaries (1609) has enjoyed an ever-wider appeal since the early seventeenth century.1 Such rising popularity has taken place despite fundamental changes in readers’ criteria of evaluation and appreciation of this work. Up to the late nineteenth century, Garcilaso’s account had been taken as the most accomplished historical depiction of the Inca, but the discovery of new written and archeological sources and the emergence of modern historiography...

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8. INCA GARCILASO AND TRANSLATION

Julio Ortega
Translated by Heike Scharm

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pp. 260-268

Historian Carmen Bernand expressed her alarm following the emphatic declaration of Cusco writer Luis Nieto during the presentation of his 2007 novel, Asesinato en la gran ciudad del Cuzco. “I detest Inca Garcilaso!” Nieto said, because he is an “emblem of a mestizaje that only exists discursively” (in La república, February 21, 2007; Bernand, 96–99). As with almost all national definitions...

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9. LOCKE AND INCA GARCILASO: Subtexts, Politics, and European Expansion

James W. Fuerst

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pp. 269-296

The following foray into Garcilacism—the study of the reception and appropriation of the works of El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (1539–1616)— is also an excursion into the political thought of John Locke (1632–1704).1 However unlikely this pairing may seem, it is one that Locke himself submitted for perusal in section 14 of his Second Treatise of Government (1689). Initially Locke’s “Promises and Bargains for Truck, &c. between two Men in the Desert Island, mentioned...

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10. SIGNIFYIN(G), DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS, AND COLONIALITY: The Royal Commentaries as Theory of Practice and Political Project

Gonzalo Lamana

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pp. 297-315

This chapter examines the production of discourses at the crossroads of domination and subversion in early colonial Peru. It presents an alternative interpretation of one of the main texts of the Amerindian intellectual production, the first part of Garcilaso’s Royal Commentaries of the Incas. By reading it as a two-layered text, an expression of double consciousness, I argue that the Royal Commentaries can be seen as a paradigmatic example of signifying in subaltern colonial...

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11. THE HISTORIOGRAPHICAL METATEXT AND NEW WORLD HISTORIOGRAPHY

Walter D. Mignolo
Translated by Barbara M. Corbett

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pp. 316-354

The only part of Reyes’s quotation that interests me here is the chronicle, its generic nature and its acceptance as literature.1 The conceptual structure of Reyes’s statement presumes that the chronicle is a genre, and a literary genre at that. But is it really? In asking the question “what is literature?” or “what is a genre?” we are confronted with a complex problem. One could answer the question in a straightforward manner, simply stating that literature is everything that our traditions...

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AFTERWORD

John Beverley

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pp. 355-368

Every form of cultural identity is inauthentic, a kind of imposture. But because of the circumstances of Spanish colonialism, Latin American cultural identity is perhaps especially so. I am far from having the scholarly authority to speak about Inca Garcilaso de la Vega or his work. At best, I know it superficially. But I know enough to at least suggest that Garcilaso might be said to be the founding moment of that Latin American cultural inauthenticity. To celebrate the...

CONTRIBUTORS

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pp. 369-372

INDEX

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pp. 373-382

Back Cover

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