Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

This book is an outgrowth of prior studies originally written as journal articles. Five of these chapters began as journal articles and were revised for this volume. Revising the articles for a book allowed me to remove inconsistencies and errors. Also, in revisiting the studies I was able to look at the connections among them and to...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

The idea for this book grew out of conducting a series of studies that dealt with talk about problems of various sorts—problems of being a teenage parent in high school, problems of interpersonal relationships during therapy, and problems of racism and interracial relations on a university campus. In each of these contexts, some critical...

Part I: Tellings in Talking Problems

read more

1. Ascribing Problems and Positionings in Talking Student Teenage Parent

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-42

These two passages from Davies and Harré (1999) capture a phenomena to be examined here—the notion of “contradictory positions as problematic.” Ascribing contradictory positions of another person can work to raise or formulate a problem for that person. Especially important for the present study is that one can position...

read more

2. Clients’ and Therapist’s Joint Construction of the Clients’ Problems

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-70

These passages from a therapist’s own account of his interventions capture a sense of the phenomena to be investigated in this chapter. The therapist offered an “alternative description” of the clients’ problems, transforming what the clients defined as “conflict” into a “balance(d) relationship.” A remarkable feature of therapeutic...

read more

3. Therapeutic Humor in Retelling the Clients’ Tellings

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-92

The usefulness of humor in therapy has long been recognized (Fry & Salameh, 1987; Strean, 1994). “(S)erious messages can be communicated by speech play and speech play is an important aspect of psychotherapy” (Ferrara, 1994, p. 144). Humor can facilitate introducing awkward topics because it signals the unreality of the...

Part II: Reportings in Talking Problems

read more

4. Reported Speech in Talking Race on Campus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-122

A variety of discourse formats are used in talking race: people tell racial narratives (e.g., stories of racism or interracial conflict), assert general propositions (e.g., “things will never change”), give examples from their own direct experience or from readings or the media, or provide explanations (e.g., “people prefer to hang out with...

read more

5. Demanding Respect: The Uses of Reported Speech in Discursive Constructions of Interracial Contact, with Princess L. Williams

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-147

The idea for the present study about respect arose from the fact that this epigram was the most frequently quoted part from Racism 101 by the African-American and Latino viewers. The activity of quoting a speaker—whether from a documentary or any kind of communication encounter is—reported speech. Reported speech is used here to...

read more

6. Discursive Constructions of Racial Boundaries and Self-Segregation on Campus

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-168

Today’s institutions of higher learning in the USA are more diverse than ever before, but at the same time, there are reports of a climate of separateness—a “new segregation” (Asante & Al-Seen, 1984; Duster, 1992; Gitlin, 1995; Steele, 1996). On university campuses it is not uncommon to see different groups socially clustering...

read more

7. Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-182

In this work we have focused on the social accountability of talking problems. This project involved two primary pieces: the construction of problems and how participants position themselves and others, and secondly, how these constructions are achieved, the communicative practices used in talking problems. The main...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-186

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-189

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-206

Name Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-210

Subject Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-214