Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

Preface

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p. ix

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1. A Southern Moses

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pp. 1-34

IN THE 1870s, during the heyday of Radical Reconstruction, Franklin Moses Jr., a member of an old South Carolina Jewish family, was a major figure in state politics. Moses, a scalawag (a radical Republican, was an influential participant in the South...

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2. The Making of a Scalawag

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pp. 35-69

BY THE END OF THE WAR, South Carolina had suffered enormous human and economic losses. Nearly twenty thousand of the state’s young men had been killed and thousands more wounded. The state’s economy had been devastated. Homes, stables, factories, and warehouses had been looted and burned. The slaves, a...

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3. Reinventing South Carolina’s Government

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pp. 70-99

ON JANUARY 14, 1868, the members of South Carolina’s Constitutional Convention assembled in Charleston. The delegates consisted of fifty-one whites and seventy-three blacks, making South Carolina’s one of only two Reconstruction-era state...

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4. Speaker Moses

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pp. 100-147

SOUTH CAROLINA'S NEWLYelected Republican government convened for the first time in July 1868. The state’s white press lost no time in launching a vigorous attack against the entire administration, not waiting to see what it would do. Merely watching the new...

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5. Governor Moses

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pp. 148-177

IN 1872, THOUGH THE FUTURE might be problematic for South Carolina’s Republicans, the present was bright. The federal government’s proceedings against the Ku Klux Klan and other paramilitary forces associated with the Democrats made it virtually impossible for the Democratic party to mount a credible campaign...

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6. Exiled from the Promised Land

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pp. 178-189

FRANK MOSES WAS thirty-seven when his term as governor ended. He had little money and few prospects. The Robber Governor’s assets consisted of approximately a hundred dollars in cash and some personal...

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Coda

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pp. 190-192

AND WHAT OF FRANKLIN MOSES? After winning his release from state custody, Moses left South Carolina. He deserted his wife and stole from his mother.1 He spent time in New York, Chicago, Boston, and other northern cities, eking out a living as a petty grifter. He was arrested in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and...

Notes

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pp. 193-211

Index

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pp. 212-219

Illustrations

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