Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface and Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

Over the past three centuries religious pluralism has become a central feature of American life. While religion began to take on a more diverse character in Britain’s North American colonies in the eighteenth century, this diversity was still of a limited nature. Many communities, especially in New England and the South, largely adhered to a single faith...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

As the European population of British North America expanded in the eighteenth century and settlements spread from the Atlantic seaboard to the interior of the continent, hundreds of new towns were founded in the colonial backcountry. Some of these new settlements developed into sizable population and market centers...

read more

1. A Quest for Order: The German Reformed Congregation, 1733-1775

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-51

Reformed settlers from the Electoral Palatinate, smaller German principalities, and Swiss cantons were the first to erect their own church in the new county town on the Conestoga, and their congregation remained the second largest in Lancaster throughout the eighteenth century. To open this study with a close look at the German Reformed congregation is rewarding in several respects...

read more

2. Growth and Disruption: Lutherans and Moravians

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-105

In 1745 the Swedish-born pastor Laurentius Thorstensson Nyberg alienated the majority of the Lutheran congregation by openly embracing the ecumenical movement initiated by the Moravian leader Count Nikolaus von Zinzendorf and attending Moravian-sponsored meetings. When about seventy members tried to prevent Nyberg from entering the Lutheran church, fistfights broke out...

read more

3. The English Churches of Colonial Lancaster

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 106-137

English speakers were a minority among the town’s inhabitants in the colonial period, they were as divided confessionally as the German-speaking population, and they organized congregations later than their German neighbors. In the Conestoga Valley as in the Penn family’s province as a whole, the Church of England constituted “one denomination among many”1...

read more

4. Religious Pluralism in an Eighteenth-Century Town

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 138-180

In a backcountry town in which several German and English congregations existed side by side, Protestant ministers were highly conscious of religious diversity and competition. The Anglican minister Richard Locke saw the Lancaster region “overrun wth Jesuitism, Moravians and New Lights” in 1748, and these competing groups were gaining “ground very much...

read more

5. Lancaster's Churches in the New Republic

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-215

Like many communities, Lancaster was affected by the struggle for American independence in numerous ways. Leading inhabitants from all major denominations sat on revolutionary committees, townsmen formed militia units and marched off to battlefields, several hundred captured British and German soldiers were imprisoned in local barracks...

read more

6. The Transformation of Charity, 1750-1820

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-236

On February 8, 1815, a number of ministers and laymen assembled in the Lancaster Court House. With the lawyer John Hubley presiding and the Episcopalian minister Joseph Clarkson acting as secretary, the meeting adopted the proposal that the “Lancaster Auxiliary Bible Society” be organized as a branch of the Pennsylvania Bible Society...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-244

In a diary entry dated February 17, 1791, Lutheran clergyman Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Mühlenberg wrote down his impressions of the Methodist movement. Their beginnings had been good, he thought, since they were basically “evangelical Englishmen.” He praised their commitment and zeal for conversion but was offended by their emphasis on outward behavior...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-262

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 263-276

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF