Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Editorial Committee

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-8

List of Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-13

List of Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 14

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 15

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 16

The ideas for the present book date back to my graduate years at Columbia University. I am profoundly indebted to Roger Bagnall, director of the Amheida Project and my PhD supervisor. His expert guidance helped me move through each stage of research and has resulted in the present book. ...

Part I: Introduction, Settings, and Methodologies

read more

Chapter 1. Domestic Archaeology and the Romano-Egyptian House

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-32

This archaeological report provides a comprehensive study of the excavations carried out at Amheida House B2 in Egypt’s Dakhla Oasis, between 2005 and 2007, followed by three study seasons between 2008 and 2010 (Figure 1.1, Figure 1.2).1 This report presents and discusses the architecture, artifacts, and ecofacts recovered from B2 in a holistic manner, which has never before been attempted in a full report on the excavation of a Romano-Egyptian house. ...

read more

Chapter 2. Situating the Case Study: The Dakhla Oasis and Amheida

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-46

The Western Desert comprises two-thirds of the land within the current boundaries of Egypt. The only refuges from the hostile environment are the five major oases—Siwa, Bahariya, Farafra, Dakhla, and Kharga. In Arabic, Dakhla means the Inner Oasis and Kharga means the Outer Oasis (that is with respect to the desert, rather than the Nile). ...

read more

Chapter 3. Approaching the Romano-Egyptian House: Research Methodologies

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-54

In this chapter I review the excavation strategy and methodology, as well as the post-excavation approach to analyzing finds from House B2. I begin with an overview of B2’s location. Then I discuss the excavation strategies employed in order to achieve the project objectives and our methodological approach to the excavations, ...

Part II: The Excavations

read more

Chapter 4. Layers of Building, Living, and Abandonment: Stratigraphies of House B2 and its Surroundings

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-140

We excavated the domestic remains of Amheida House B2 over the course of three seasons (2005–2007). We dedicated three additional seasons to finds processing (2008–2010). The majority of the material presented in this volume was excavated in February of 2005 and 2006, and we conducted additional research in the vicinity of B2 in February of 2007. ...

Part III: Building Techniques and Architectural Interpretations

read more

Chapter 5. Building Domestic Space: The Construction Techniques for House B2

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-156

From the Ptolemaic until the Byzantine period, most Egyptian houses were built in mud brick. Fired bricks and stone were used primarily to consolidate building corners, stairs, and foundations for mud brick structures.1 B2 conforms to the standard construction features of most Romano-Egyptian mud brick houses, and this chapter will explore these construction techniques in detail. ...

read more

Chapter 6. Situating Domestic Space: An Architectural Analysis and Reconstruction of House B2

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-182

This chapter engages the archaeological evidence with regional and temporal domestic architectural comparanda. Although it is not possible to produce a definitive reconstruction for all of the B2 attributes, I consider likely scenarios and offer a potential reconstruction. I will review: (1) the size, (2) orientation, (3) overall layout, (4) specific attributes and features of this structure, ...

Part IV: The Material Culture of Everyday Life

read more

Chapter 7. Artifact and Activity: The Material Culture of Domestic Living

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-200

The excavation in and around B2 produced a wealth of small finds for a house of its size, although comparable houses from Kellis have produced even more finds. Over 300 objects are catalogued from this house and its immediate surroundings. This material culture reveals a good deal about the B2 inhabitants (or Area 1 inhabitants more generally) and their placement with respect to society in Roman Egypt. ...

read more

Chapter 8. La Céramique de la Maison B2

Delphine Dixneuf

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-280

Les recherches archéologiques conduites sur la maison B2 ont livré un matériel céramique abondant et diversifié, daté principalement du Bas-Empire, voire du début de l’Antiquité tardive. En 2007, nous avons été chargée de l’étude de ce matériel1 ; toutefois, il convient de préciser qu’une analyse préliminaire de la céramique avait été commencée par Gillian Pyke2. ...

read more

Chapter 9. Unfired Clay Objects

Paola Davoli

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-290

This kind of object has been found only inside the house and particularly in room 3. Their number is not as great as one would expect from a domestic context, because the context of B2 is very shallow and may not have preserved everything that was in it at the time of its abandonment. None of them bear the impression of seals. ...

read more

Chapter 10. Figurines

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 291-308

Figurines may be defined as anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, or geometric objects that are typically (although not always) made of clay or stone. These objects had the capacity to provoke the men, women, and children who lived in the houses of Amheida to think about negotiable issues of identity, sexuality, status, and human representation. ...

read more

Chapter 11. Adornment

Angela Cervi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 309-318

The objects of adornment found comprise seven beads made of glass and faience, one glass bracelet, one faience amulet, one bone pin, and two bronze finger rings. ...

read more

Chapter 12. Glass Vessels

Angela Cervi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-340

Inside the house, and in the adjoining areas, we found a significant assemblage of glass vessel fragments that form a homogeneous group of domestic finds of everyday use. This assemblage is quite different from the glass vessels recovered to date from the other investigated structures of Amheida. ...

read more

Chapter 13. Faience Vessels

Angela Cervi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-348

The number of faience vessel fragments recovered in the area is not significant. The diagnostic pieces can be referred to ten vessels in total. The presentation of these few fragments, found in a context dated to the advanced third century, could however provide a contribution to the study of Roman faience vessel typologies and their dating. ...

read more

Chapter 14. Coins

David M. Ratzan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 349-352

Three worn coins were recovered from Area 1, all associated with late occupational layers of House B2. Each was likely minted in the first or second century CE. The documentary evidence recovered from B2 suggests that the house was built sometime in the third century, a dating supported by the ceramic evidence (see Chapters 15 and 8, respectively). ...

read more

Chapter 15. Transport and Trade in Trimithis: The Texts from Area 1

Giovanni R. Ruffini

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 353-368

The texts from Area 1 of Trimithis generally share a connection to estate management, with a particular focus on transportation and disbursement.1 The archaeological remains are from a noticeably different social register than those of the large elite structure House B1. In keeping with this trend, the twenty-two texts from Area 1 seem chiefly to concern Trimithites of a lower social register. ...

read more

Chapter 16. Faunal Remains from Amheida, Area 1

Pam J. Crabtree, Douglas V. Campana

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 369-374

This chapter describes the analysis of the faunal remains from Area 1 in Amheida that were excavated over three seasons between 2005 and 2007. While archaeologically recovered faunal remains have traditionally been used to study economic questions, such as the reconstruction of animal husbandry, hunting, and diet, animal bone remains can also be used to address a broader range of social, political, and other questions including status, trade, ethnicity, and colonialism.1 ...

read more

Chapter 17. Plant Use in a Romano-Egyptian Household in the Third Century CE

Ursula Thanheiser, Johannes Walter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 375-392

The Dakhla Oasis is a remote place in the Western Desert of Egypt. It owes its existence to phreatic water feeding to the surface along natural vents. Precipitation is practically non-existent and if it rains at all, this rain occurs as localized torrential downpour. In combination with the high average temperature, this lack of regular precipitation has an adverse effect on any plant growth, and rain-fed agriculture is impossible. ...

read more

Chapter 18. Wood Objects

Angela Cervi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 393-396

Only four wooden objects were found in House B2: a door lock-bolt (18.1), a handle, probably from a basket (18.2), a stopper (18.4), and a fragment from a bed or chair frame (18.3). None of them shows singular working techniques, jointing or decorations. Additionally, no wood species identifications have been made. ...

read more

Chapter 19. Woven Material

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 397-404

Woven materials may be defined as objects that have been formed by interlacing or intertwining material. Both textiles and basketry fall under the general rubric of woven materials, and both of these forms are represented in House B2 at Amheida. Woven material was a much-neglected artifact category in the earliest days of Egyptology. ...

Part V: Concluding Thoughts and Discussion

read more

Chapter 20. Towards an Integrative Interpretation of Life in a Romano-Egyptian House

Anna Lucille Boozer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 405-428

The preceeding chapters provide the grounding for this summative approach to daily life within B2. This holistic presentation of the material contributes to the overarching goal: to investigate the relationship between domestic life and social identity in Roman Egypt. ...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 429-456

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 457-460