Cover

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Half title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 4-7

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Work on Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Native Archive has spanned many years and many communities of friends, colleagues, and mentors. Along the way I have accrued countless debts. My work on don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora began in graduate school during classes I took, serendipitously in the same semester, with Margarita Zamora and Steve Stern. ...

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Introduction: Giving and Receiving

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pp. 1-12

Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Native Archive focuses on the production and circulation of Native American knowledge within and beyond the indigenous communities of colonial Mexico. I begin with a gift, passed materially and symbolically from a family with deep roots in Mexico’s pre-Columbian past to a son of recent Spanish immigrants. ...

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1. Creoles, Mestizos, and the Native Archive

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pp. 13-40

On May 21, 2014, three volumes of manuscripts that had belonged to don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora centuries ago were to be auctioned by Christie’s in London. Known as Bible Society Manuscripts 374 (BSMS 374), the first and second volumes contain the original manuscripts of don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s five historical works, ...

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2. Land, Law, and Lineage: The Cacicazgo of San Juan Teotihuacan

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pp. 41-76

When don Juan de Alva Cortés died in 1682, he entrusted his will and the transfer of the cacicazgo (family estate) in San Juan Teotihuacan to his dear friend don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora.1 Alva Cortés was the unmarried and childless elder son of don Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and he had inherited his father’s archive of native materials. ...

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3. Configuring Native Knowledge: Seventeenth-­Century Mestizo Historiography

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pp. 77-108

In his unfinished study on the work of the historian, Marc Bloch says that writing history is heavily contingent on the moment in which it is produced and thus it is ever shifting.1 “The past,” he said, “is, by definition, a datum which nothing in the future will change. But the knowledge of the past is something progressive which is constantly transforming and perfecting itself ” (1954, 58). ...

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4. Circulating Native Knowledge: Seventeenth-­Century Creole Historiography

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pp. 109-138

Don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora sought earnestly to share his wealth of knowledge about the native people and their traditions, yet he was never commissioned to write a text dedicated to this topic about which he was so passionate. In the prologue to his Parayso occidental (1684), Sigüenza bemoans the fact that he was unable to bring to light books he had written on a range of topics connected to the native inhabitants of New Spain, ...

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Epilogue: Native Knowledge and Colonial Networks

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pp. 139-142

On September 17, 2014—just one day after 16 de septiembre and the commemoration of Mexican independence—in a grand ceremony linked to two historic celebrations, three volumes of colonial-era manuscripts were officially returned to Mexican soil. In the press release from INAH cited above (2014), these materials are tightly linked to a tradition of patriotic historiography and the construction of national identity in the twenty-first century. ...

Notes

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pp. 143-168

Bibliography

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pp. 169-186

Index

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pp. 187-196