Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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p. vii

Illustrations

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p. viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

As this is a work that attempts to address questions, it seems legitimate to begin with the fundamental question, Why—seventy-five years on and thousands of books later—another book on World War II? On one level, despite the number...

Dramatis Personae

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pp. xiii-xvii

Abbreviations

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p. xviii

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Prologue

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pp. xix-xx

At 2:41 a.m. on the morning of 7 May 1945 in Reims, France, Lieutenant General Walter B. Smith, U.S. chief of staff of the Supreme Headquarters Expeditionary Force, accepted from General Alfred Jodl the German High...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

The questions surrounding coalitions, the nations that compose them, and their strategies are timeless. Indeed, in the twenty-five hundred years since Thucydides first described the complexities posed in achieving close...

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1. Lessons Lived, Learned, Lost

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pp. 11-32

Before examining Anglo-American military cooperation during the period 1937–1941, some understanding of the previous experiences in coalition warfare, the so-called intellectual baggage that each power brought to the...

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2. Neither Friend nor Foe

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pp. 33-48

If the British and Americans achieved any understanding of the complexities in coalition warfare from their experiences in World War I, that wisdom quickly faded from memory. This occurred not out of any conscious decision to avoid...

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3. Groping in the Dark

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pp. 49-64

In broad daylight on 12 December 1937, Japanese aircraft sank the gunboat U.S.S. Panay and three Standard Oil tankers anchored in the Yangtze River off Nanjing, China. All vessels were clearly marked with large, painted American...

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4. Ties That Bind

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pp. 65-80

In the wake of “the war to end all wars” and the Great Depression, the western European democracies eschewed the maintenance of sizeable military forces or the materiel necessary to equip them. This resulted in a general state of...

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5. The Americans Come to Listen, August–September 1940

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pp. 81-104

The fall of France in June 1940 marked a major watershed in World War II. The crushing defeat of Allied forces in France and the Low Countries demonstrated the ruthless power of the Wehrmacht. The loss of France also left an extremely...

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6. Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

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pp. 105-130

In the wake of the Anglo-American Standardization of Arms Committee talks, cooperative efforts between Great Britain and the United States entered a new phase. The U.S. War Department, true to the recommendation made by...

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7. Full-Dress Talks

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pp. 131-160

On 23 January 1941, Britain’s newest battleship, H.M.S. King George V, sailed into the mouth of the Potomac River bearing Edward F. L. Wood, Lord Halifax, the new ambassador to the United States. Attached to his party and...

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8. Easier Said Than Done

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pp. 161-188

With the conclusion of ABC-1 at the end of March 1941, coalition efforts entered a new phase. Planning shifted from the largely theoretical plane of grand strategy and broad strategic lines of effort to the formulation of plans...

Photographs

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9. Muddy Waters

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pp. 189-216

The coalition’s failure to agree on a strategic approach to the Far East was not the only thread left hanging from ABC-1. American negotiators never fully bought into the British policies and strategies for the Mediterranean and...

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10. Racing an Unseen Clock

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pp. 217-234

While Anglo-American collaboration during late summer and early fall of 1941 concentrated on the issues of the higher direction of the war, during the latter days of 1941 planners in Washington, London, and the Far East strove to...

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Conclusion

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pp. 235-256

By the time the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Britain and the United States had been engaged in collaborative military efforts for nearly four years. Granted, much of the early collaboration was hesitant and rudimentary. However, the...

Chronology

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pp. 257-260

Notes

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pp. 261-342

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 343-386

Index

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pp. 387-408