Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half title, Title page, Copyright, Further titles

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xxxviii

As a prolific and talented comic book creator, Ed Brubaker occupies an interesting position in the contemporary comics scene as a self-described pulp writer, devoted to the conventions of superhero and crime stories. He describes himself as such in a time when contemporary comics are now often distanced from their pulp origins by creators who prefer to connect the medium to more culturally approved art and design traditions. ...

Chronology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxxix-xliii

read more

Cat Got Ed’s Tongue

Jennifer M. Contino

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-7

Ed Brubaker’s responsible for the new life that a certain cat is enjoying right now. The Catwoman has returned and Brubaker is at the helm, scribing her latest adventures. Over the past ten years many of today’s hottest writers have taken a turn on the feline fatale and a lot of fans are anxious to see how Brubaker’s run will be different. ..

read more

Ed Brubaker Interview

Keith Giles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 8-16

Ed Brubaker has got the tiger by the tail these days. He’s gone from writing alternative comics to writing DC’s flagship Batman comic and now he’s on board as the writer for DC’s Catwoman each month. Still, he finds time to launch a new book next year on Wildstorm’s Mature line of comics starting with a five-issue miniseries called Point Blank ...

read more

An ORCA Q&A with Ed Brubaker

Tim O’Shea

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-22

Ed Brubaker has helped reinvigorated the Batman universe, simply put. And now he’s dabbling with the Wildstorm universe through the new series, Sleeper. Fortunately, in between writing various titles, this master of comics noir granted me an e-interview. I wish to thank Ed for his time and thoughts. Enjoy. ...

read more

Interview with Ed Brubaker

Kuljit Mithra

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-30

With the fifth issue of “The Devil in Cell-Block D” out this week, writer Ed Brubaker chats with me about what’s come before and what is ahead for Daredevil. ...

read more

The Right to Remain Violent: Brubaker Talks “Criminal”

Dave Richards

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-36

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are hoping crime does pay because their new creator-owned series Criminal from Marvel’s Icon imprint hits stores this Wednesday. The new ongoing series follows a large cast of interconnected characters and the various felonious acts they often engage in. ...

read more

Brubaker’s Noir World

Mark Rahner

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-39

You wouldn’t notice Leo Patterson if you bumped into him on the street. But later, you might trace your missing wallet back to that anonymous bump. ...

read more

Ed Brubaker Interview

Duane Swierczynski

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-49

I want to send him back to, say, December 1950, dead broke, with nothing more than a typewriter, ream of paper, and the address of Gold Medal books editor Richard Carroll. Then, I’d just sit back and wait for him to conquer the world of mystery paperback originals. ...

read more

Interview with Zoe Bell and Ed Brubaker

Joshua Cohen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 50-53

Created by the Ed Brubaker (who’s credited with helping revive the crime comics genre and according to one fan, “manipulates crime fiction like Stephen Hawking’s does time and space”), starring Zoe Bell (who’s garnered cult celebrity status from a career as a stunt double to the stars and starring in Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof), ...

read more

An Interview with Ed Brubaker

Chris Mautner

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-66

Incognito is an idea I’ve been mulling over since we were wrapping up Sleeper. I often try to think of the inverse of an idea to see what would be interesting—if this idea is interesting to explore in one direction would it be interesting to explore it in the other? Look at a story like The Shield, where you’ve got a corrupt cop who’s trying to save his soul. ...

read more

Ed Brubaker: Crime, Superheroes, and Comic Book History

Kiel Phegley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-72

The simplest way to describe Criminal is that it’s a straight crime comic. But slowly over the course of the series, you and Sean have been introducing a larger story about generations of criminals tied to one robbery in the ’70s. How would you describe the larger concept? ...

read more

Interview: Ed Brubaker

Oliver Sava

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-88

I had been on an exclusive contract with DC. I was just wrapping that up, and Brian Bendis, who I’d known since the early ’90s, when we were both working in independent comics, was becoming a big writer at Marvel, and he’d been wanting me to come write something at Marvel. And I just kept staying at DC and doing Catwoman and Batman, and stuff at Vertigo and Wildstorm. ...

read more

Adapting Your Own Work: An Interview with Ed Brubaker

Sean Hood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-95

Sometimes I do interviews on this blog in order to reach out to writers and filmmakers I admire. This is certainly the case with Ed Brubaker, author of the award-winning graphic novel series Criminal, as well as Incognito and the recent series Fatale. He’s one of those comic book writers who, as the cliche goes, “transcends the genre” and gets reviewed in the New York Times. ...

read more

Brubaker Drives “Fatale” into a Creator-Owned Career

Kiel Phegley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-103

Though it’s far from their first, second, or even fifth project together, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’s Image series Fatale continues to be a lynchpin title for the creators. In over a decade of creating comics together, the noirish horror mashup will likely end up being their longest single series collaboration. ...

read more

Catching Up with Fatale Writer Ed Brubaker

Mark Rozeman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 104-112

The past few Fatale issues have taken a break from the traditional structure seen in the first ten issues. Whereas the first two arcs alternated between the present day and an ongoing story set in the past, the last couple of issues have focused on different standalone stories set in different time periods. What was the decision-making behind that structure? ...

read more

The Outhouse Interview: Ed Brubaker

Royal Nonesuch

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-119

For years, Ed Brubaker was known as the popular comics writer whose work struggled to find a large audience. Though he wrote a Batman title for DC, his profile couldn’t bring enough eyeballs to smaller, well-regarded titles as Sleeper and Gotham Central. ...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-125