Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. ii-v

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

Bruce J. Malina

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p. ix

Human beings are embedded in a set of social relations. A social network is one way of conceiving that set of social relations in terms of a number of persons connected to one another by varying degrees of relatedness. In the early Jesus group documents featuring Paul and coworkers, it takes little effort to envision the apostle’s collection of friends and friends of friends that is the...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xi

I should like to acknowledge my appreciation for the assistance given me in the production of this manuscript. In particular I am indebted to Bruce J. Malina and the members of the Catholic Biblical Association Task Force of the Social-Scientific Methodology who initiated me into this methodology for understanding the New Testament. My enormous thanks go as well to Andrew Jorgenson for...

References to Apollos in the New Testament

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pp. xiii-xvi

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Introduction: Who Is Apollos?

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pp. 1-6

Apollos is an enigmatic character in the New Testament. His name appears in only three different writings: 1 Corinthians (1:10-17; 3:1-9, 21-23; 4:1-7; 16:12), Acts of the Apostles (18:24-28), and the letter to Titus (3:13).1 These references are brief, yet the issues surrounding Apollos’ appearance raise many questions. Mystery surrounds his character and his relationship to Paul. As is evident from Paul’s own Corinthian correspondence, Apollos’ presence...

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Chapter 1: Apollos: “Sense of the Self”

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pp. 7-19

To gain an accurate and faithful understanding of the New Testament character Apollos, it is essential to situate him within the framework of the first-century Mediterranean culture and society. In reading documents from the ancient world, we are conscious that we have to avoid all forms of anachronism. Anachronism means projecting onto the past the customs, ways of acting...

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Chapter 2: Apollos: Embedded in a Collectivistic Culture

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pp. 20-45

In the previous chapter, we discussed Apollos’ sense of self as a first-century Mediterranean person. In this chapter, I wish to develop the examination further. To understand Apollos, as well as all who populate the pages of the New Testament, we must view them, not as individuals, but as collectivists. Since first-century Mediterranean societies were collectivistic, we need to investigate...

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Chapter 3: Apollos and Corinth: First-Generation Testimony

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pp. 46-67

In our previous two chapters, we situated Apollos as a collectivist within the cultural and social world of the first-century Mediterranean. This study provided us with good insight into his collectivistic personality, the groups in which he was embedded, and the attitudes and values stemming from this collectivistic culture. In all this, we gained an appreciation for how remarkably different...

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Chapter 4: Apollos of Alexandria: Third-Generation Recollections

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pp. 68-101

In the previous chapter, we examined authentic information from the first Pauline generation about Apollos, gleaned from the first letter to the Corinthians. Apollos emerged as a change agent in his own right. He was an impressive speaker who attracted much attention (and allegiance) in Corinth. He worked in conjunction with Paul who proudly acknowledged him as a “brother,” a fellow kinsman...

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Conclusion: Apollos: Partner of Paul

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pp. 102-109

Two main sources formed the basis for our study of the person of Apollos: the social and cultural world of first-century Mediterranean persons; and two New Testament documents from two Pauline generations (Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians [from the first Pauline generation] and the Acts of the Apostles [from the third Pauline generation]). From these sources, Apollos...

Notes

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pp. 110-117

Bibliography

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pp. 118-123

Index of Persons and Subjects

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pp. 124-133

Scripture and Ancient Authors Index

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pp. 134-136