Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-xii

List of Bibliographical Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

read more

Preface

Pierre-Marie Gy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvii-xviii

Eric Palazzo went from art history to the study of medieval liturgical sources, into which he now initiates liturgist-apprentices and medievalist-apprentices. In addition, he has seen in many medievalists both a strong interest in the liturgy and the place it occupies in medieval life, and the fear of a little-known domain and one apparently difficult to explore. ...

read more

Preface to the English Language Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xix-xx

Almost three years have elapsed since this book was published in the original French and The Liturgical Press offered to make an English translation, a proposal which makes me feel honored. First of all, I wish to express my most sincere thanks to this publishing house as well as to the translator, Madeleine Beaumont, for the work that has been done. ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xxi

This book was born during my stay in Göttingen at the French Historical Mission in Germany during the academic year 1990–1991. Michel Parisse, then director of the Mission, had suggested that I take advantage of my year in Germany to prepare a manual of introduction to the liturgical books of the Middle Ages in order to answer the historians’ growing demand in this domain. ...

read more

The Liturgical Year: History and Definition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxiii-xxiv

The liturgical year as we know it today is the result of a number of successive transformations that for the most part took place in the course of the first centuries of Christianity.1 Discounting the variations and changes in details that have occurred as time went on, one can affirm that by the year 600, ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxv-xxx

“In my opinion, this book stresses remarkably the importance for both the historian and the liturgist of a history of the liturgy anchored in history at large, or rather constituting a domain of this history, perhaps one of the most secret, but also one of the most important.” So writes Jacques Le Goff in his preface to a collection of articles by P.-M. Gy.1 ...

Part 1: Historiography of the Research on Liturgical Books

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 1

read more

I. The Science of the Liturgy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-6

Since paleo-Christian times, liturgists have occupied a central place among the great figures in the history of Christianity. Often they are at the same time officiants whose active part in the celebrations gives life to the liturgists’ reflections on the meaning of the celebration in the Church; they are also theologians who live their faith through the liturgy in which they participate. ...

read more

II. Studies on Liturgical Books

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-18

Several famous names in liturgical science have marked the research on the history of liturgical books. We must again go back to the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries to meet those who established the foundations, and even sometimes more than the foundations, of the historical investigation of liturgical books.13 ...

Part 2: The Books of the Mass

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-20

read more

I. The Sacramentary, the Book of the Celebrant

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-61

During the High Middle Ages, the principal book for the celebration of the Mass is the sacramentary.2 It contains all the texts of orations and prayers needed by the celebrant, whether a parish priest, a bishop, or the pope, for every day of the liturgical year. ...

read more

II. The Books of Chant

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-82

The history of liturgical chant in antiquity and the High Middle Ages interests not only musicologists but also liturgists and historians. Numerous studies by musicologists especially make it possible to reconstruct the history of the liturgico-musical forms of the High Middle Ages through the different families of liturgical chant. ...

read more

III. The Books of Readings

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-105

Among the three essential actions of the liturgy, prayer, chant, and reading, this last occupies a predominant place because of its well-established role in the cultic practices of the early Christians. The reading of the Scripture goes back to the very beginning of Christian worship, ...

read more

IV. Genesis and Development of the Missal

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-110

Thanks to the work of some great scholars of the twentieth century, we have gained a fairly good knowledge of the general conditions in which the genesis and development of the missal took place. The pioneering studies of A. Ebner,323 A. Baumstark,324 A. Wilmart,325 A. Dold,326 and V. Leroquais,327 ...

Part 3: The Books of the Office

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 111

read more

I. History and Function of the Office in the West

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-127

The history of the Office, today more often called the Liturgy of the Hours, has for a long time awakened the researchers’ interest. Recently, excellent surveys have been published; as a consequence, I shall limit myself here to recalling the main phases of the development of the Prayer of the Hours in the West, ...

read more

II. Chant at the Office

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-144

The oldest liturgical book is the Psalter, which was probably composed between the tenth and third centuries B.C.E. This collection of lyrical poems, numbering 150,39 was written in Hebrew and later on translated into Latin from the Greek version of the Septuagint. Particularly suitable for spiritual meditation, ...

read more

III. Prayer at the Office: The Collectar

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-148

“It is the celebrant’s book at the Office, containing the readings and collects. Today only a few exist in one or the other religious order, to the point that many a liturgist does not even know the word “collectar.” The function of this book was parallel to that of the sacramentally: ...

read more

IV. Reading at the Office

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-160

At the Office, there are three sorts of readings: scriptural, patristic, and hagiographic, to which correspond as many sorts of books, albeit not always clearly differentiated. At first, these books were joined together into the Office lectionary; later on, the lessons found their place in the breviary along with other parts of the Office. ...

read more

V. The Books of the Office of Prime

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-167

Long neglected by liturgists, the books used for the office in chapter [the room where a community of monastics or canons assemble] after Prime have of recent years been the object of a renewed interest, especially on the part of historians. In fact, only the martyrology had been studied previously by many liturgists. ...

read more

VI. Genesis and Development of the Breviary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-172

The history of the breviary has benefited from the assiduous work of many liturgists so that today we are able to retrace the steps of the genesis and development of this book during the Middle Ages and the following centuries.202 ...

read more

Part 4: The Books of Sacraments and Rites

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-174

For any cultic celebration, one needs sacred texts and guidelines for conducting the rites. In the Christian liturgy, orations, organized into formularies, biblical readings, and sung pieces, appear in books intended for the different ministers having a part in the worship service.1 ...

read more

I. The Ordines Romani

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-185

An ordo concerns a precise liturgical action for which it assembles together both the sacred texts to be spoken (incipits of the orations, readings, chants, and so on) and under the form of rubrics, the rules governing, sometimes to the slightest detail, the performance of this action.2 ...

read more

II. The Rituals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-194

The history of the rituals failed to arouse the interest of a large number of liturgists, either those of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries or those of the twentieth century. The particular status of this liturgical book explains for a large part this relative historiographic void. ...

read more

III. The Pontifical, the Book of the Bishop

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-212

The history of the pontifical in the Middle Ages has been made almost entirely clear thanks to the research of C. Vogel and R. Elze on the Romano-Germanic Pontifical dating from the tenth century (from now on referred to as RGP);67 that of M. Andrieu on the pontificals from the second half of the Middle Ages;68 ...

read more

IV. The Customaries

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-220

In the typology of the liturgical books of the Middle Ages, the customaries occupy a place apart because of their mixed status as books of and for the liturgy on the one hand and as collections of the usages of daily life on the other hand. Although it was not a liturgical book in the strict sense, that is, it was not used during the worship services, ...

read more

V. The Ordinaries

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-228

Ordinaries belonged to the same category of books concerned with the liturgy as the customaries, the collections of rules, and even the reading guides (for the refectory, for example) of which we spoke above. The ordinaries answered the need for codification of the liturgical usages of the clergy, whether religious or diocesan, ...

read more

VI. The Processionals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-232

Situated at the boundary between several other books pertaining to the liturgy, the processional has not yet gained the attention it deserves on the part of historians because it is commonly associated with other books.178 However, the fact that it is frequently joined to an antiphonal or a collectar has resulted in its being studied, albeit partially, by those specializing in these books. ...

read more

VII. The Ceremonials

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-235

The ceremonials are in some ways the end result of the typological evolution of the ordinaries at a time (mainly the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries) the books used in worship had entered a further phase in their history. Compared to the ordinary, the ceremonial was at once more precise in its instructions concerning the performance of the rites and devoid of any reference to liturgical texts (chants, prayers, readings). ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 236-239

By way of epilogue to this history of the liturgical books in the Middle Ages in the West, I would simply recall three points, already met with in this book, for which the study of the sources of the liturgy proved of particular interest and whose important contribution to the history of the Middle Ages it highlighted. ...

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-243

Index of Persons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-247

Index of Places

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 249-251

Index of Liturgical Pieces

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 253

Index of Manuscripts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-258