Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Table of Figures

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

This project was generously funded by the Editing Modernism in Canada project in affiliation with the Social Sciences and Research Council of Canada, as well as by St. Francis Xavier University’s Start-up Grant and University Council for Research Award. The University of Toronto also offered valuable support during this project’s early stages. This book has been published with the help of a grant from the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, through the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program, using funds provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xlviii

Separated lovers, a tree-clad “Indian” reserve, and a woman who jumps to her death do not comprise a “new” (Evening Despatch) or “unusual” (Stage) play by today’s standards, but early-twentieth-century reviewers clamoured for The God of Gods’ (1918) “original” (E.C.) tale of “the North American Indian” (Johnston).1 Written by Carroll Aikins, an avid promoter of Canadian theatre, The God of Gods has been performed in the United Kingdom more often than in Canada and found its first success during its premiere at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, in 1919, when reviewers applauded the “rare artistic delicacy” (Evening Despatch) and heralded it as “the first drama written by a Canadian to...

The God of Gods

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pp. 1-6

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Act I

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pp. 7-29

The scene represents the edge of a grassy, pine-clad plateau overlooking a lake and a range of mountains. To the left is a small circular tepee of weatherstained birch bark. To the extreme right is a large rock. The right entrances are before and behind this rock. The left entrance is well forward, screened by trees. Near the tepee is a cooking oven of blackened stones, and beside it, an earthenware water pot. At right-centre is a fallen log, and above it an old pine with heavy foliage....

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Act II

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pp. 30-47

The scene represents a rocky canyon and is divided from left to right by a deep chasm at the bottom of which is a swift stream. The chasm is spanned by a huge, hideous stone image of the God of Gods. At the feet of the image, in an iron basket is a fire of pine bark. Beside the fire are a pot of meat scraps, a cup of wine and a sacrificial knife. The altar is approached by three stone steps; below, the torrent thrashes into the deep pool; beside it, at the right, is a pile of pine bark....

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Act III

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pp. 48-62

SCENE—The same as Act II. Fifteen minutes have elapsed. It has grown a little darker. Otherwise, the scene is unchanged. As the curtain rises, Suiva enters from the cavern, goes stealthily to the base of the flat rock, and calls softly....

Explanatory Notes

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pp. 63-70

Textual Notes

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pp. 71-84

Dossier

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pp. 85-132

Works Cited

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pp. 133-140

Backcover

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