In this Book

summary
In this wide-ranging analysis, W. Lawrence Hogue argues that African American life and history is more diverse than even African American critics generally acknowledge. Focusing on literary representations of African American males in particular, Hogue examines works by James Weldon Johnson, William Melvin Kelley, Charles Wright, Nathan Heard, Clarence Major, James Earl Hardy, and Don Belton to see how they portray middle-class, Christian, subaltern, voodoo, urban, jazz/blues, postmodern, and gay African American cultures. Hogue shows that this polycentric perspective can move beyond a “racial uplift” approach to African American literature and history and help paint a clearer picture of the rich diversity of African American life and culture.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. iii-v
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  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xiii
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  1. Chapter One. Introduction: Approaching African American Life, History, Literature, and Criticism Polycentrically
  2. pp. 1-11
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  1. Chapter Two. History, the White/Black Binary, and the Construction of the African American as Other
  2. pp. 13-33
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  1. Chapter Three. The White/Black Binary and the African American Sociopolitical Mission of Racial Uplift
  2. pp. 35-65
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  1. Chapter Four. Finding Freedom in Sameness: James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man
  2. pp. 67-92
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  1. Chapter Five. Disrupting the White/Black Binary: William Melvin Kelley’s A Different Drummer
  2. pp. 93-117
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  1. Chapter Six. Exposing Limiting, Racialized Heterological Critical Sites: An Existential Reading of Charles Wright’s The Messenger
  2. pp. 119-145
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  1. Chapter Seven. The Blue Idiom Lifestyle, Counter-Hegemony, and Clarence Major’s Dirty Bird Blues
  2. pp. 147-170
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  1. Chapter Eight. Naming the Subaltern: The Swinging Life and Nathan Heard’s Howard Street
  2. pp. 171-197
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  1. Chapter Nine. Identity Politics, Sexual Fluidity, and James Earl Hardy’s B-Boy Blues
  2. pp. 199-224
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  1. Chapter Ten. Voodoo, A Different African American Experience, and Don Belton’s Almost Midnight
  2. pp. 225-251
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  1. Chapter Eleven. Conclusion
  2. pp. 253-255
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 257-271
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 273-281
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 283-291
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780791487006
Related ISBN
9780791456934
MARC Record
OCLC
55896333
Pages
291
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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