In this Book

Fifty Years after Faulkner
summary

These essays examine issues across the wide arc of Faulkner’s extraordinary career, from his aesthetic apprenticeship in the visual arts, to late-career engagements with the Cold War, the civil rights movement, and beyond, to the place of death in his artistic vision and the long, varied afterlives he and his writings have enjoyed in literature and popular culture. Contributors deliver stimulating reassessments of Faulkner’s first novel, Soldiers’ Pay, his final novel, The Reivers, and much of the important work between. Scholars explore how a broad range of elite and lowbrow cultural forms—plantation diaries, phonograph records, pulp magazines—shaped Faulkner’s capacious imagination, and how his works were translated into such media as film and modern dance. Essays place Faulkner’s writings in dialogue with those of such fellow twentieth-century authors as W. E. B. Du Bois, Ernest Hemingway, Richard Hall, and Jayne Anne Phillips; locate his work in relation to African American intellectual currents and Global South artistic traditions; and weigh the rewards as well as the risks of dislodging Faulkner from the canonical position he currently occupies.

While Faulkner studies has cultivated an image of the novelist as a neglected genius who toiled in obscurity, a look back fifty years to the final months of the author’s life reveals a widely traveled and celebrated artist whose significance was framed in national and international as well as regional terms. Fifty Years after Faulkner bears out that expansive view, reintroducing us to a writer whose work retains its ability to provoke, intrigue, and surprise a variety of readerships.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Introduction
  2. Jay Watson
  3. pp. 1-14
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  1. Note on the Conference
  2. pp. 15-22
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  1. Faulkner and the World Culture of the Global South
  2. Ramón Saldívar
  3. pp. 23-39
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  1. Considering the Unthinkable: The Risks and Rewards of Decanonizing Faulkner
  2. Deborah Clarke
  3. pp. 40-50
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  1. Yoknapatawpha Pulp, or What Faulkner Really Read at the P.O.
  2. David M. Earle
  3. pp. 51-65
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  1. “Things Are Back to Normal Again”: Reassessing Soldiers’ Pay
  2. Jason D. Fichtel
  3. pp. 66-76
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  1. “Born Again”: Faulkner and the Second Birth
  2. Hortense J. Spillers
  3. pp. 77-98
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  1. Hail Faulkner? A Fable, Competitive Modernism, and “the Nobelist” in the 1950s
  2. Joseph Fruscione
  3. pp. 99-114
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  1. Phillips’s Termite and Faulkner’s Benjy: What Disability?
  2. Terrell L. Tebbetts
  3. pp. 115-126
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  1. Pictures and Words in Faulkner’s Early Graphic Work
  2. Randall Wilhelm
  3. pp. 127-141
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  1. “Ravel Out into the No-Wind, No-Sound”: The Audiophonic Form of As I Lay Dying
  2. Julie Beth Napolin
  3. pp. 142-157
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  1. Addie Bundren Lives! Feminist Bodies in Valerie Bettis’s Modern Dance Adaptation of As I Lay Dying
  2. Michael P. Bibler
  3. pp. 158-173
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  1. Ricky Bobby’s William Faulkner: Talladega Nights and the Transnational South
  2. Matthew Pratt Guterl
  3. pp. 174-187
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  1. Reading the Forms of History: Plantation Ledgers and Modernist Experimentation in William Faulkner’s “The Bear”
  2. Patrick E. Horn, Jessica Martell, Zackary Vernon
  3. pp. 188-208
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  1. Faulkner and the Inheritors of Slavery
  2. David A. Davis
  3. pp. 209-219
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  1. “We—He and Us—Should Confederate”: Stylistic Inversion in Intruder in the Dust and Faulkner’s Cold War Agenda
  2. pp. 220-231
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  1. Long Faulkner: Charting Legacy on a Civil Rights Continuum
  2. Ted Atkinson
  3. pp. 232-241
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  1. “Who Was William Faulkner to Them?”: Racial Liberals and Civil Rights Workers in the Civil Rights Era
  2. Sharon Monteith
  3. pp. 242-255
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  1. “You Cant Know. You’re the Wrong Color”: Faulkner’s Copernican Revolution in The Reivers
  2. François Pitavy
  3. pp. 256-262
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  1. Looking Back at Social Change in The Reivers
  2. Richard C. Moreland
  3. pp. 263-273
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  1. “What the Future Will Now Bring Forth”: Reminiscing for Posterity in The Reivers
  2. Cheryl Lester
  3. pp. 274-287
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  1. William Faulkner and the Southern Way of Death
  2. Charles Reagan Wilson
  3. pp. 288-298
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  1. The Performative Funeral and Identity Formation in Go Down, Moses
  2. Elizabeth Fielder
  3. pp. 299-314
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 315-319
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 320-328
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