Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xv

I began this book in 2005 moved by concern for the lack of congressional oversight of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. As I reviewed the sweep of more than sixty years of legislative involvement in U.S. foreign policy after World...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

A book almost nine years in the making imposes on the good will of many different colleagues, students, administrators, friends, and family. Most individuals fit into particular stages of the project, so I acknowledge them...

PART I: INFORMATION, REGULAR ORDER, AND DEMOCRATIC ACCOUNTABILITY IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

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INTRODUCTION: Oversight Hearings and U.S. Foreign Policy

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pp. 3-20

At the dawn of the Cold War, the United States confronted one of the most consequential foreign policy choices of the post–World War II generation. The Truman Doctrine, which the president announced in a speech to Congress on...

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1: Guarding the Guardians through Oversight

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pp. 21-46

In the spring of 2004, the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee proposed public hearings regarding the conduct and objectives of the Iraq War, which was then entering its second year amid rising violence and...

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2: Committee Motivations for Oversight

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pp. 47-68

The Vietnam War represents the nadir of congressional influence over foreign policy in the eyes of many political observers. Legislators had given President Lyndon B. Johnson a blank check in the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution...

PART II: OVERSIGHT HEARINGS AND REGULAR ORDER IN U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS

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3: Institutional Change and Senate Committee Hearings

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pp. 71-97

When Ronald Reagan debated President Gerald Ford during the 1976 primary, he adopted a tough stance toward the Panama Canal, declaring, “ We bought it. We paid for it. It is ours.”1 Reagan’s words crystallized the internal...

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4: Committee Goals and Oversight Strategies

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pp. 98-131

A month after losing his bid for reelection, President George H. W. Bush announced on December 4, 1992, that the United States would participate in peacekeeping operations in Somalia. Members of Congress had pushed hard...

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5: Police Patrols and Fire Alarms in U.S. Foreign Policy

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pp. 132-168

Lt. Gen. Kevin Kiley, surgeon general of the Army, sat at the witness table in the hearing room of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on March 5, 2007, confronting irate lawmakers. The general, who had been...

PART III: RECLAIMING CONGRESSIONAL WAR POWERS

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6: Return to the Rule of Law in International Affairs

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pp. 171-185

Why should Americans care about a topic as arcane as oversight hearings in the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committees? We could speculate about whether the frequency, content, and openness of committee...

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7: Reforming National Security Oversight in the Senate

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pp. 186-202

Several weeks before his inauguration, President-Elect Barack Obama met with two former secretaries of state to discuss improving means for consultation about foreign policy between the White House and Capitol Hill. James...

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Appendix A: Coding Congressional Committee Hearings

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pp. 203-208

Congressional hearings are a rich source of information for scholars and are becoming more useful for empirical research because of the availability of electronically searchable databases. The Policy Agendas Project at the...

Appendix B Description of Dependent and Independent Variables

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pp. 209-211

Appendix C: Methodological Appendix to Chapter 3

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pp. 212-217

Appendix D: Methodological Appendix to Chapter 4

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pp. 218-224

Appendix E: Methodological Appendix to Chapter 5

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pp. 225-234

References

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pp. 235-250

Index

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pp. 251-260