Front Cover

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Half title, Series info, Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

During the process of writing this book my thinking has been greatly enriched by a number of individuals who have offered support, feedback, and inspiration. I am particularly grateful to Li Bennich-Björkman, who has been an unfailing source of advice and ideas from the outset of this project. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-14

How should we understand the state? This question has been widely addressed in reference to Western countries but considerably less so in many other parts of the world. At first glance, Kyrgyzstan, a small mountainous country of beguiling beauty bordering China in post-Soviet Central Asia, ...

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Chapter 1. The Framework

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pp. 15-40

Since this study conducts a constitutive analysis of what kind of state has emerged in contemporary Kyrgyzstan, there is a need to develop a theoretical framework that enables us to understand the logic of that particular state. In particular, the framework must enable us to systematically account for the stark contrasts between the importance of formal political institutions ...

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Chapter 2. Market Access: Recruitment to the State

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pp. 41-69

All states need personnel, and the purpose of this chapter is to examine the recruitment of public officials. Scholars have observed changes in the recruitment of political elites as well as civil servants after the break-up of the Communist Party monolith and the cadre recruitment system maintained by the party. ...

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Chapter 3. Why Invest?: Motives for Buying Public Offices

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pp. 70-93

In the first decade after the fall of the Soviet Union, specific attention was paid in regard to the state and the economy to how the state interacts with the market and its role in generating economic growth. The dominant view was to understand the state as a “grabbing hand,” an obstacle to economic prosperity that must be removed from the economy.1 ...

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Chapter 4. How to Make a Return on the Investment

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pp. 94-120

A high level of corruption in countries undertaking a transition from the Soviet state was initially seen as an inevitable by-product of the conversion from a centrally planned economy to a free market economy. Indeed, for a long time it was common to argue that corruption may even be the grease that helps spur economic and political modernization.1 ...

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Chapter 5. Market Stability and Instability

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pp. 121-132

Although I have argued that there is a distinct informal order to this state, Kyrgyzstan has nonetheless seen much instability over the past decade, including two forceful changes of government in 2005 and 2010. The two Kyrgyz revolutions have been illuminated in a number of in-depth studies.1 ...

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Chapter 6. The Investment-Market State in Comparative Perspective

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pp. 133-145

Is the investment-market state specific to Kyrgyzstan, or does the theoretical framework developed here have broader ramifications? Given this study’s principal focus on Kyrgyzstan, an attempt to address this issue must inevitably be preliminary in nature. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 146-156

The use of informal payments lies at the heart of political and administrative organization in post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan. A multitude of unofficial financial exchanges bind together the state internally as well as defining its relationship with citizens. Consequently, state officials are primarily engaged in making money for themselves, for their families, and for their bosses, ...

Notes

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pp. 157-202

Bibliography

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pp. 203-224

Index

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pp. 225-230

Back Cover

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p. 231