Cover

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pp. 8-9

Half title, Series Info, Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

There can be little doubt that imperialism shaped the world we live in. The Western colonies and other projections of Western power that blanketed much of Asia and Africa by the early twentieth century created a world system so asymmetrical that whole civilizations reeled in response.1 ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

This book has been a long time coming, and my debts are large. Among those who helped get me started were Anthony Reid, Rufus Hendon, William Roff, William Frederick, William Liddle, Robin Winks, Ibu Hermina Tobing, and Katharine Pierce. A Fulbright grant under the Islamic Civilization Research Program in 1982 funded my first year of research about Hamka in Indonesia, ...

Note on Spelling, Transliteration, and Translation

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pp. xix-xx

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Prologue

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pp. 3-11

Like that of many twentieth-century men and women, Hamka’s story begins as a colonial story. ...

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1. Society’s Compass

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pp. 12-40

By the mid-1930s, Medan had emerged as a city of well over seventy-seven thousand people, one of the fastest growing in the Dutch Indies.1 From its largely Chinese business district, writes geographer Charles Robequain, “the quarters containing the big [European] business offices, administration buildings, banks, headquarters of the associations, hospitals, and private villas spread out comfortably . . . intersected by wide, shady streets.”2 ...

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2. Father and Son

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pp. 41-72

Hamka’s indomitable father, Haji Rasul, died before World War II was over. Hamka last saw him in January 1944 while visiting Java.1 By this time Hamka had nearly completed the first draft of a biography of Haji Rasul called Ajahku (My father). Published in 1950 after Hamka had settled in Jakarta, the book captured vividly Haji Rasul’s character ...

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3. Hamka-san and Bung Haji

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pp. 73-95

Don’t panic!” Hamka had urged his readers in the final issue of Society’s Compass. Yet, as he described what happened next in his memoirs years later, Hamka himself panicked in the chaos preceding the arrival of Japanese troops. ...

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4. Islam for Indonesia

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pp. 96-125

From Indonesia’s new capital, Hamka looked out across the cities and towns and villages of the nation and to the global umma Islam and the wider world beyond. But for the rest of his life, it was the nation that concerned him most.1 In Jakarta, he carved out a unique role for himself among the new country’s emerging national intelligentsia. ...

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5. Culture Wars

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pp. 126-152

After moving to Jakarta in late 1949, Hamka had rented a small house in a rabbit warren–like neighborhood called Sawah Besar, or Big Paddy. He settled his family on Toa Hong Lane II, a site that still bore the marks of fresh construction. Chinese carpenters lived nearby, and visitors remember maneuvering around wooden beams and other building materials lying about in the lane.1 ...

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6. The New Order

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pp. 153-192

Hamka’s life now resumed. He returned to his house across from the Al-Azhar Mosque and to the routines of his daily life. Aside from his prayers and dawn lessons at the mosque, he devoted his mornings to writing, then made the rounds of the city to record radio and television lectures and to teach, visit his publishers, meet with officials and Muhammadiyah leaders, ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 193-198

As a young man rising in the Dutch Indies, Hamka had indulged in fantasies of personal ambition and fame. He dreamed of becoming a great literary lion, a pujangga, for his new country. “I will be Hamka of Indonesia,” he wrote in the dawning years of independence. ...

Notes

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pp. 199-256

Bibliography

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pp. 257-270

Index

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pp. 271-286

Further Series Titles

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