Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

At 4:30 A.M. on 12 April 1861, the report of a gun boomed across Charleston Harbor. The gunshot began a forty-hour bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, signaling the start of the Civil War. A naval...

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1. Had failure been possible: The Navy's Response to War

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pp. 1-16

In April 1861, Abraham Lincoln did not fully comprehend the role that the United States Navy would play during the Civil War. Winfield Scott, the general in chief of the United States Army, likewise did not...

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2. Glory again to our arms: The Capture of Eastern North Carolina

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pp. 17-38

Near mid-morning 23 September 1861, several officers climbed into a boat lying beside the frigate Congress. The last man on board was Captain Louis Malesherbes Goldsborough, a rather large man with a temper to match. The captain's gig made its way...

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3. Richmond Is a Hard Road to Travel: The Peninsular Campaign

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pp. 39-59

An anonymous Southern composer managed to capture the essence of the war in the East with a satirical song entitled "Richmond Is a Hard Road to Travel." One of the verses recounts the "half a dozen trips and the half a dozen slips" of the Union forces...

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4. We have no use for the river: The Navy in the Eastern Theater

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pp. 60-82

Following the Peninsular campaign, the navy's role in the eastern theater was characterized by idleness. During the next two years, the Union army failed to utilize the gunboats in the Chesapeake. The successive Union commanders attempted to outmaneuver...

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5. The enemy are . . . within the ring: Stalemate in North Carolina

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pp. 83-118

By mid-I862, the strategic situation in North Carolina seemed a stark contrast to that of Virginia. Combined operations had allowed the Union forces to capture all the major towns that lay near the inland waters of the state. They faced no naval threat and...

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6. Uncle Sam's web feet: Operations in the Interior Waters

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pp. 119-141

In August 1863, Abraham Lincoln wrote to his friend James Conkling, "Nor must Uncle Sam's web feet be forgotten. At all the watery margins they have been present. Not only on the deep sea, the broad bay, and the rapid river, but ... wherever the ground was...

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7. Results go far different from those desired: Acquiring and Maintaining the Fleet

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pp. 142-166

When President Lincoln announced his intention to blockade the coasts of the Southern states, he probably did not grasp the unprecedented scope of this undertaking. The coastline from the Potomac to the Rio Grande stretched 3,500 miles and contained...

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8. No chance for manavelins: Supplying the Squadron

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pp. 167-183

To maintain an effective blockade, the Navy Department faced the task of supplying warships along a tremendously long coastline. By early 1862, the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron patrolled approximately 450 miles of this coastline, as well as the Chesapeake...

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9. Economize fuel all you can: Coaling the Gunboats

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pp. 184-199

Gideon Welles once remarked, "Steam has become such an indispensable element in naval warfare, that vessels propelled by sails only, are considered useless for war purposes.'" This statement was certainly proved true during the Civil War. The change from...

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10. To make bricks without straw: Men and the Navy

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pp. 200-217

Manpower is one of the most important factors in the running of a ship. A shortage of officers and men, sickness, poor morale, or a combination of these and other factors can influence not only the operation of the vessel but in a larger context can also affect the squadron. One of the first measures of the president...

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11. We are all anxious to make the blockade efficient: The Coastal Blockade

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pp. 218-248

The crew of the Union blockader Florida had just begun to raise anchor when the lookout at the masthead shouted, "Sail ho." The officer showed almost no emotion as he sent word of the strange ship to the captain. This formality had been repeated so often...

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12. Ishmaelites upon the broad ocean: The Blockade Runners

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pp. 249-270

The squadron's major function and the reason for its original existence was the blockade of the Confederate coastline. From mid-1862, this meant the blockade of Wilmington and the small inlets directly north and south of the Cape Fear River. The blockade of the...

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13. We are looking for old Abe's fleet: The Capture of Wilmington

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pp. 271-302

On 2 September 1861, just four days after the surrender of Fort Hatteras, the Blockade Strategy Board discussed the idea of capturing Wilmington. The board deliberated outfitting an expedition in New York, and then landing a few hundred men in...

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14. Weary of the war: Conclusion

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pp. 303-310

In 1865, the Confederacy lay in its death throes. It was surrounded and virtually cut off from the outside, while the Union armies systematically cut wide swaths across the South and destroyed its means to wage war. The Union navy played a decisive role in...

Notes

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pp. 311-406

Bibliography

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pp. 407-432

Index

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pp. 433-455