Cover

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Frontmatter, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvii

In a life that spanned every decade of the twentieth century, Bessie Margolin contributed to some of the most significant legal events in modern American history: she defended the constitutionality of the New Deal’s Tennessee ...

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1 Childhood, 1909–1925

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pp. 1-15

“Becy Margolyn” was the way the midwife recorded the name of the baby girl born to Rebecca Goldschmidt Margolin and her husband, Harry, on February 24, 1909. She was the second child for the Russian-Jewish...

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2 College and Law School, 1925–1933

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pp. 16-34

At age sixteen Bessie Margolin moved out of the Jewish Orphans’ Home and entered Newcomb College. Although she was free of the Golden City and its rules, for the next five years the Home and its superintendent ...

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3 Summer with a Suffragist, 1933

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pp. 35-40

Margolin arrived in Washington, D.C., on June 1, 1933. An air of great vitality and movement was sweeping the sleepy city.1 In the eighty-nine days since President Franklin D. Roosevelt took office, his bold plans to rouse the...

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4 Defending the New Deal’s Tennessee Valley Authority, 1933–1939

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pp. 41-66

When she started her legal career, Bessie Margolin was one of only 3,385 women lawyers in the nation.1 Although that number had nearly doubled since 1920 due to suffrage and the increasing number of law...

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5 Bachelor Girl

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pp. 67-82

Margolin had joined TVA when she was twenty-four and le" shortly a"er she turned thirty. During that time, as her sister and closest female friends married and assumed traditional roles as wives, mothers, and ...

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6 Wages and Hours, 1939–1946

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pp. 83-99

On March 16, 1939, Bessie Margolin began her job as a senior litigation attorney at the Labor Department’s fledgling Wage and Hour Division, making a lateral move from TVA that reflected her eagerness for a new opportunity ...

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7 An Interesting Adventure in Nuremberg, May–December 1946

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pp. 100-112

When Margolin presented her fourth and fi"h Supreme Court arguments in Roland and Boutell, Justice Robert H. Jackson was not on the bench. He was in Nuremberg, Germany, leading the United States’s prosecution of ...

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8 Return to the Labor Department, 1947–1961

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pp. 113-134

When it first hit newsstands in 1939, the magazine Glamour of Hollywood promised to show its readers “The Hollywood Way to Fashion, Beauty, Charm” by focusing on the lives of movie stars: their mansions, limousines, and...

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9 Equal Opportunities, Personal and Public, 1961–1972

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pp. 135-162

In January 1961 Margolin’s successes earned her the Labor Department’s coveted Career Service Award, granting a year of paid leave for pursuits to further her work. Under the award’s generous terms she spent four...

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10 Retirement and Last Years, 1972–1996

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pp. 163-170

Bessie Margolin’s January 1972 retirement affair, much like the woman herself, was elegant, gracious, and reflected careful attention to detail. It was no ordinary retirement party for a Washington bureaucrat. More than ...

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Appendix 1. Bessie Margolin’s Arguments at the Supreme Court

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pp. 171-172

Bessie Margolin presented twenty-four arguments at the United States Supreme Court, constituting twenty-seven separately docketed cases, set forth in the table that follows. Of these twenty-four arguments, she prevailed on...

Appendix 2. Program and Abbreviated Guest List for Bessie Margolin’s Retirement Dinner

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pp. 173-177

Notes

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pp. 179-220

Bibliography

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pp. 221-232

Index

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pp. 233-243