In this Book

summary
In Red Alert: Marxist Approaches to Science Fiction Cinema, editors Ewa Mazierska and Alfredo Suppia argue that Marxist philosophy, science fiction, and film share important connections concerning imaginings of the future. Contributors look at themes across a wide variety of films, including many international co-productions to explore individualism versus collectivism, technological obstacles to travel through time and space, the accumulation of capital and colonization, struggles of oppressed groups, the dangers of false ideologies, and the extension of the concept of labor due to technological advances.Red Alert considers a wide swath of contemporary international films, from the rarely studied to mainstream science fiction blockbusters like The Matrix. Contributors explore early Czechoslovak science fiction, the Polish-Estonian co-productions of director Marek Piestrak, and science fiction elements in 1970s American blaxploitation films. The collection includes analyses of recent films like Transfer (Damir Lukacevic), Avalon (Mamoru Oshii), Gamer (Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor), and District 9 and Elysium (Neill Blomkamp), along with more obscure films like Alex Rivera's materialist science fiction works and the Latin American zombie films of Pablo Parés, Hernán Sáez, and Alejandro Brugués. Contributors show that the ambivalence and inner contradictions highlighted by the films illustrate both the richness of Marx's legacy and the heterogeneity and complexity of the science fiction genre.This collection challenges the perception that science fiction cinema is a Western or specifically American genre, showing that a broader, transnational approach is necessary to fully understand its scope. Scholars and students of film, science fiction, and Marxist culture will enjoy Red Alert.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Introduction: Marxism and Science Fiction Cinema
  2. Ewa Mazierska and Alfredo Suppia
  3. pp. 1-24
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  1. 1. First Contact or Primal Scene: Communism Meets Real Socialism Meets Capitalism in Early Czechoslovak Science Fiction Cinema
  2. Petra Hanáková
  3. pp. 25-47
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  1. 2. Soviet and Post-Soviet Images of Capitalism: Ideological Fissures in Marek Piestrak’s Polish-Estonian Coproductions
  2. Eva Näripea
  3. pp. 48-71
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  1. 3. Paying Freedom Dues: Marxism, Black Radicalism, and Blaxploitation Science Fiction
  2. Mark Bould
  3. pp. 72-97
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  1. 4. The Biopolitics of Globalization in Damir Lukacevic’s Transfer
  2. Sherryl Vint
  3. pp. 98-120
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  1. 5. Capitalism and Wasted Lives in District 9 and Elysium
  2. Ewa Mazierska and Alfredo Suppia
  3. pp. 121-148
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  1. 6. Marxism vs. Postmodernism: The Case of The Matrix
  2. Tony Burns
  3. pp. 149-178
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  1. 7. Representation of “Gaming Capitalism” in Avalon and Gamer
  2. Ewa Mazierska
  3. pp. 179-201
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  1. 8. Remote Exploitations: Alex Rivera’s Materialist SF Cinema in the Age of Cognitive Capitalism
  2. Alfredo Suppia
  3. pp. 202-228
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  1. 9. Rags and Revolution: Visions of the Lumpenproletariat in Latin American Zombie Films
  2. Mariano Paz
  3. pp. 229-250
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 251-254
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 255-263
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780814340127
MARC Record
OCLC
951346865
Launched on MUSE
2016-06-10
Language
English
Open Access
No
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