Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This book aims at putting detailed historical research to twofold use. It elucidates a particularly significant and momentous episode in the development of science—the origin of electrodynamics—and sharpens our analytic view of one of the most important epistemic tools of modern science: the experiment. The close relationship between historical and philosophical analyses that I have attempted...

read more

INTRODUCTION

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-17

What molecular geneticist François Jacob has here so colorfully and accurately described is the contrast between the image of research science shows to the outside world and the actual research practice of the laboratory. It is no coincidence that Jacob, like Ludwik Fleck, whom he invokes, was active in the life sciences. What he describes as the night side of the sciences has traditionally been more clearly recognized within ...

read more

CHAPTER 1. Electricity and Galvanism in the Early Nineteenth Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-51

“On all of the customary routes, the doctrine of electricity is so well-trodden and well explored, that there is nothing left to be found on the highway; one must march cross-country and plumb the ditches” (Lichtenberg 1972, 2:472 [no. 384]).1 Thus did Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, in the early 1790s, describe the state of a field to which he himself had made substantial contributions. He was not alone in this assessment.2 By this period, the traditional topics of electrical research were receding into the background. In their place, at the...

read more

CHAPTER 2. Electromagnetism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-84

The study of electricity and magnetism took a dramatic turn with the discovery of electromagnetic interaction in 1820. It triggered an avalanche of new work, such that for a few years the topic dominated the journals even more thoroughly than Volta’s discovery twenty years prior. New questions were posed, new phenomena discovered, new instruments and concepts developed, and previously unknown actors...

read more

CHAPTER 3. Ampère’s First Studies of Electromagnetism: Entering a New Field

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-142

Ampère’s early work on electromagnetism proceeded in two distinct phases of unequal duration. The first phase comprised the three weeks leading up to September 25, 1820, while the second continued through the four months that followed, ending in January 1821. Previous historical studies have given careful attention to only the second of these phases. As discussed in the preceding...

read more

CHAPTER 4. Competing Pursuits in Paris, 1820–1821

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-201

This chapter turns to Ampère’s further work through January 1821, that is, to the point when a lengthy pause in his efforts set in. My objective is to present Ampère’s various activities in such a way as to shed light on the connections among them, as well as between them and aspects of his situation in Paris. The changes in his experimental practice, his energetic attempts to perform a measurement ...

read more

CHAPTER 5. Electromagnetism in London

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 202-227

Scientific research in early nineteenth-century England was conducted within institutional structures completely different from those in France. These structures had emerged as the product of historical tradition, not deliberate planning. In sharp contrast to France, in England, as in other European states, there was nothing resembling an integrated, planned, or rigorously organized system of research and ...

read more

CHAPTER 6. Faraday’s First Studies: Electromagnetic Rotation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 228-300

Immediately after submitting the first two parts of his “Historical Sketch,” Faraday began his own electromagnetic research.1 Conditions at the Royal Institution allowed him to pursue his own research interests, at least for short periods. Over the course of an extremely intensive week he not only made a spectacular discovery but also completed a very wide-ranging article that, in print, would comprise twenty-two pages. The stunning novelty of electromagnetic rotation...

read more

CHAPTER 7. Experiment and Concept Formation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-338

The previous chapters have repeatedly raised questions regarding experimentation and its role in the generation of knowledge. In this final chapter I discuss these questions in more general terms, drawing on and extending aspects of the philosophy of science, epistemology, and historiography. In the first three sections I provide...

APPENDIX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-422

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 423-460

REFERENCES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 461-490

INDEX OF NAMES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 491-494

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 495