Cover

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Series Page

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pp. i-iii

When we take a larger view of a film’s “life” from development through exhibition, we find a variety of artists, technicians, and craftspeople in front of and behind the camera. Writers write. Actors, who are costumed and made-up, speak the words and perform the actions described in the script. Art directors and set designers develop the look of t...

Title, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. iv-v

Contents

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pp. vi-ix

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Introduction

Claudia Springer

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pp. 1-24

Film actors leave us with indelible impressions by bringing characters to life. Audiences often cherish a film for its memorable performances, and reviewers typically pay particular attention to acting when they evaluate a film. Effective acting may appear effortless, but it is actually a product of a performer’s careful labor and the changing conventions in performance styles, which are continually being transformed by technological, industrial,...

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1. The Silent Screen, 1895–1927

Victoria Duckett

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pp. 25-48

Vachel Lindsay’s Art of the Moving Picture was first published in 1915. One of the earliest attempts to assess acting in silent film critically, it today serves as an important guide to the nascent reception of screen acting in America. Lindsay not only asserts that acting on screen is an art form that must be taken seriously, but also argues that theatrical stars who exhibit the gestural style of the European theater have no place in the American ...

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2. Classical Hollywood, 1928–1946

Arthur Nolletti Jr.

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pp. 49-73

The eighteen-year period from 1928 through 1946, which began a year before the Great Depression and ended with the aftermath of World War II, was a time of trauma and uncertainty for American society, as well as for American cinema. The stock market crash of October 1929 was followed by a decade of dire hardship that left millions out of work. In 1933 newly elected President Franklin Roosevelt initiated a series of federal acts and...

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3. Postwar Hollywood, 1947–1967

David Sterritt

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pp. 74-94

The years following World War II were a time of transition for American cinema, as for American culture in general. A prolonged economic boom joined with advances in consumer technology, the growing influence of corporate power, military and ideological competition with the Soviet bloc, the mushrooming youth market spawned by the Baby Boom, and other factors to shape a psychological climate that oscillated among...

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4. The Auteur Renaissance, 1968–1980

Julie Levinson

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pp. 95-119

The years between 1968 and 1980 comprised a singular period in the history of American movies, not to mention in the culture at large. A perfect storm of social, economic, industrial, and ideological factors conspired to throw the film industry into upheaval. One of the upshots of that upheaval was a fleeting cultural moment variously known as the Auteur Renaissance, the New Hollywood, or, nostalgically, Hollywood’s last golden...

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5. The New Hollywood, 1981–1999

Donna Peberdy

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pp. 120-142

In both popular perception and box office earnings, the American cinema of the 1980s and 1990s was dominated by the size, strength, and spectacle of the blockbuster. Spanning 1981 to 1999, a “new new Hollywood” saw the beginning of a new multinational, corporate Hollywood, defined by the rise of the conglomerates and by the “high concept” filmmaking ...

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6. The Modern Entertainment Marketplace, 2000–Present

Cynthia Baron

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pp. 143-168

Developments in the American entertainment industry since 2000 have increasingly required professionals to demonstrate their ability to create cogent expressions of compelling human emotions, whether working as actors in Hollywood blockbusters or in niche-market dramas, or as voice talent, motion-capture performers, animators, or videogame designers. Screen performances have always been “hybrids of human agency and technological...

Academy Awards for Acting

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pp. 169-178

Notes

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pp. 179-200

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 201-204

Notes on Contributors

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pp. 205-208

Index

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pp. 209-218