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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-v

The Author

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p. vi

Contents

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pp. vii-xi

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Foreword

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pp. xiii-xiv

The name Hermeneia, Greek EPJJ.TJVf'ia, has been chosen as the title of the commentary series to which this volume belongs. The word Hermeneia has a rich background in the history of biblical interpretation as a term used in the ancient Greek-speaking world for the detailed, systematic exposition of a scriptural work. It is hoped that the series, like its name, will carry forward this old and venerable tradition. A second, entirely practical reason for selecting the name lies in the desire to avoid a long descriptive title and its inevitable ...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xviii

Although one of the shorter epistles in the New Testament, the First Epistle of Peter has more than its share of conundrums associated with it. In dispute are author, readers, time of writing, situation in the Roman Empire vis-a-vis the Christian faith when it was composed, and the overall structure of the argument, to mention but a few. Also notorious are the difficulties connected with understanding such passages as 3:18-22 or 4:1-6, the form...

Reference Codes

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pp. xix-xxxv

Editor’s Note

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p. xxxvi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-76

The very first words of this letter, "Peter, apostle of jesus Christ," pose a problem for many modern interpreters. To be sure, for centuries, and in some quarters still, the identification of the author as Simon Peter of Galilee has been accepted at face value and the letter understood as coming from the mind, if not the pen, of the apostle himself. Arguments to support such a judgment point to the early and continued identification...

Commentary 1 Peter

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Epistolary Opening (1:1–2)

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pp. 79-89

Peter, apostle1 of Jesus Christ, to the elect2 who are sojourners of the diaspora of Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 3 2/ (elect) in accordance with the purpose of God the Father by means of the sanctification of the Spirit for the purpose of obedience and the sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ:...

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Prooemium (1:3–12)

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pp. 90-113

Following the epistolary opening, these ten verses provide an introduction to the subject matter of the letter. Cast in the form of a singe if rather complex sentence, 1 these verses divide themselves into three major parts, the second and third with two subparts each, by means of relative clauses introduced with relative pronouns. 2 The major division...

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Body Opening (1:13–2:10)

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pp. 114-168

...but the context indicates the mood of the main verb to be indicative rather than imperative. 1 The pattern is again absent from the final verses (2:7 -1 0), which have no main verb at all, probably in that way signaling the end of the section. Such a linguistic pattern allows us to divide the passage into sense-segments corresponding to its presence:...

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Body Middle (2:11–4:11)

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pp. 169-300

"in order that God may be glorified"). Unlike the body opening, however, the organization of the body middle is determined by shifts in groups addressed rather than by repeated linguistic patterns. The addressees move from the readers in general (2: 11-17) to specific groups (2: 18-3:7) and back to the readers in general (3:8-...

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Body Closing (4:12–5:11)

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pp. 301-347

This portion of the letter is the shortest of the three parts of the body of the letter, although it is closer in length to the body opening than to the body middle. 1 Thus there is a rough symmetry of short/ long/ short to the major part of the letter. The language of the body closing is somewhat more straightforward, with proportionately more indicative and imperative verbs and fewer participles, particularly adverbial participles...

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Epistolary Closing (5:12–14)

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pp. 348-358

By way of Silvanus. the faithful brother as I regard him. I have written to you briefly.1 exhorting and bearing witness that this is the true grace of God; take your stand2 in it. 13/ She who is the fellow elect one in Babylon3 greets you, ..

Bibliography

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pp. 359-382

Indices

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pp. 383-421

Designer’s Notes

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pp. 422-424

Book Back Inner

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