Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xii

The series is designed to be a critical and historical commentary to the Bible without arbitrary limits in size or scope. It will utilize the full range of philological and historical tools including textual criticism (often ignored in modern...

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvi

The commentary, friends and colleagues tell me, is at present not the most creative genre and format within which to work. It is true that after centuries of scholarly scrutiny spent on the Biblical texts one gets the impression that there...

Reference Codes

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pp. xvii-xxix

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Editor’s Note

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p. 34

The English translation of Paul's Epistle to the Galatians was provided by the author; it reflects his exegetical decisions. Other biblical texts are usually from the Revised Standard Version. Quotations from...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-34

The question of the authorship of Galatians does not present great difficulties. The epistolary preface (I : 1) names the Apostle Paul as the author of the letter. Paul's authorship found unquestioned acceptance in antiquity. Comparison with other letters of Paul shows...

Galatians

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I. Epistolary Prescript (1:1–5)

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pp. 37-43

The epistolary prescript of the Galatian letter can be recognized easily and then separated from the letter. It is also interesting that at several points there are interrelations between the preface and the body of the letter. It is at these points that the theological tendencies and...

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II. Introduction (Exordium) (1:6–11)

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pp. 44-56

Aristotle advises that if the audience is already attentive, the speaker may start his speech by directly introducing a summary of the "facts." The Rhetorica ad Herennium names the summary of the causa as a means for making the hearers attentive and receptive...

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III. The Statementt of Facts (Narratio) (1:12–2:14 )

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pp. 57-112

The quality of brevity will be achieved, " if in the first place we start at the point of the case at which it begins to concern the judge, secondly avoid irrelevance, and finally cut out everything the removal of which...

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IV. The Proposition (Propositio) (2:15–21)

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pp. 113-127

Since antiquity the question has been discussed whether Paul's account of the episode at Antioch ends with 2: 14, or whether it includes 2: 15-21 as a summary of the speech he made at Antioch. Those who assume that...

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V. The Proofs (Probatio) (3:1–4:31)

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pp. 128-252

Viewing Galatians from a rhetorical perspective suggests at once that chapters 3 and 4 must contain the probatio section. Admittedly, an analysis of these chapters in terms of rhetoric is extremely difficult. One may say that Paul has been very successful- as a skilled...

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VI. The Exhortation (Exhortatio) (5:1–6:10)

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pp. 253-311

It is rather puzzling to see that parenesis plays only a marginal role in the ancient rhetorical handbooks, if not in rhetoric itself. Consequently, modern studies of ancient rhetoric also do not pay much attention to...

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VII. Epistolary postscript: conclusio (6:11–18)

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pp. 312-327

In 6:11 - 18 Paul adds a postscript in his own handwriting. This conforms to the epistolary conventions of the time. An autographic postscript serves to authenticate the letter, to sum up its main points, or to add...

Appendices

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pp. 328-335

Bibliography

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pp. 336-340

Indices

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pp. 341-352

Back Cover

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