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1 Corinthians

A Commentary on the First Epistle to the Corinthians

by Hans Conzelmann; edited by George W. MacRae S.J.; and translated by James W. Leitch

Publication Year: 1975

Explicates and comments on each verse in an historical and theological context and provides extensive notes on the translation from the Greek text.

Published by: Augsburg Fortress Publishers

Series: Hermeneia: A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible

Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword to Hermeneia

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pp. ix-x

The series is designed to be a critical and historical commentary to the Bible without arbitrary limits in size or scope. It will utilize the full range of philological and historical tools including textual criticism (often ignored in modern...

Reference Codes

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pp. xi-xxi

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Editor’s Note

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p. xxii

The English translation of First Corinthians at the head of each section of this Commentary is an original one produced from the Greek text by the translator and the editor of the volume, with a view to reflecting the exegetical options followed in the...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

For a reconstruction, account must be taken of the references to further letters, both from Paul to Corinth (5:9) and from Corinth to Paul (7:1), as also of the further correspondence that can be gathered from 2 Corinthians. Hand in hand with the literary...

1 Corinthians

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The Opening (1:1–3)

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pp. 19-24

A fellow writer is mentioned by Paul elsewhere also.12 The introduction of Sosthenes13 as a "brother" accords with the customary designation used by the Christians for each other, but also hints at the distance between him and the "Apostle." 14 The word order "Christ Jesus" is...

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The Proemium (Thanksgiving) (1:4–9)

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pp. 25-29

The "proemium" is, following the profane epistolary style, an established element at the beginning of Paul's epistles. This thanksgiving already belongs (again as in profane letters) to the "context"; it can even introduce the main theme. Although it is adapted...

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Part I: The Divisions in the Community, 1:10–4:21

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p. 30

The correspondence begins with 1:10. Now of course the whole letter is concerned with topical subjects which had arisen in Corinth or been put to Paul in the form of inquiries. Compared to these, however, this first part again forms an exception, because Paul must first of...

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The Groups in the Community (1:10–17)

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pp. 31-52

Establishing who "Chloe's people" are (children, members of her household?) is not possible. Nor can we be sure whether Chloe lives in Corinth (which after all is the more likely assumption) or possibly in Ephesus. In the latter case her people would have returned from a...

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The Figure of the Preacher and the Form of His Preaching (2:1–5)

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pp. 53-69

To be sure, the statements of the new section go a great deal further than this. The section is dominated by a pneumatic enthusiasm, a distinction between two classes of believer. The pneumatics here do not comprise all Christians, but only a superior class. The offense of the...

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Concluding Discussion of the Party System; Preacher and Community (3:1–17)

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pp. 70-81

Paul's assertion that he commands a wisdom which is unknown to the Corinthians, that his religious status is accordingly superior to theirs, has been buttressed by mythological allusions. This provokes the question why he has kept it to himself. The answer of course is that...

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A Demonstration with Reference to Paul and Apollos (4:1–13)

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pp. 82-93

The idea that provides the transition is not expressed, but has to be reconstructed. Surprisingly, Paul does not hark back to 2:6ff and 3:1ff and declare, "You cannot judge me, for you are fleshly." But then, according to...

Part II: The Crisis of “Bios,” Chapters 5–6

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πορνεία, “Sexual Immorality”

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pp. 94-102

The transition to the new subject is apparently unmediated. Paul does indeed indicate an external ground, oral reports from Corinth. The people vouching for this information are not named, and cannot be inferred from other passages. Despite the absence of a...

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Church and World (6:1–11)

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pp. 103-107

This section is highly significant from the standpoint both of ecclesiastical and of secular history. It shows us the first hints of an internal jurisdiction on the church's part which ever since Constantine's day has been a regular part of the legal setup and has belonged as such...

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Freedom and Sexuality (6:12–20)

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pp. 108-113

The statement, like others of its kind, is so formal as to be suited for use in various speculative frameworks, e.g., Cynic, Stoic, Gnostic. We must therefore distinguish between its historic source and the Corinthian understanding of it, and we must go on to ask how far...

Part III: Answers to Questions, Chapters 7-15

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pp. 113-114

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Celibacy and Marriage in the Passing World, Chapter 7

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pp. 114-136

There follows a summary of the individual cases. Paul's view has an ascetic stamp; he does not give reasons for it. The manner in which he then applies it in the concrete instances is, to be sure, specifically theological, in the sense of his doctrine of the freedom of the...

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Freedom and Idol Sacrifices, Chapters 8–10

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pp. 137-138

Now both forms of argumentation are Pauline in content. The question is, however, whether Paul can argue both ways in the same breath. A further point is the harshness of the transitions from 8 to 9: 1, from 9 to 10:1, from 10:22 to 10:23. Verse 23 can be joined either to...

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The Criterion of Conduct: Love and Knowledge (8:1–6)

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pp. 139-150

The specific understanding of the nature of the liberating gnosis is so far still an open question: it can be understood as enlightenment on the nature of the gods in the sense of popular philosophy, or as illumination of the pneumatic, or as a specifically Gnostic insight into the...

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The Freedom of the Apostle (9)

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pp. 151-163

Chap. 9 surprisingly introduces a new theme: the apostleship of Paul. Is the present context secondary from the literary standpoint, especially as there appear to be breaks also at the end of the chapter? While it is certainly possible to see a comprehensive theme in the topic...

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The Warning Example of the Wilderness Generation (10:1–13)

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pp. 164-180

Verse 2 brings the typological interpretation in terms of baptism. How far is it possible for Paul here, too, to operate with motifs from Jewish and pre-Pauline Christian exposition? And how strictly does he regard the correspondence? Does he think that the process...

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Questions of Divine Worship, (11:2–14:40)

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pp. 181-203

The first section, 11:2-16, regulates the conduct of women in the service of worship, namely, the question of their clothing, more especially of their headgear. Paul bases his ruling on cosmological and anthropological observations of a fundamental kind. In these we can...

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The Criterion (12:1–3)

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pp. 204-216

The criticism is prepared for by a retrospective glance at the erstwhile participation of the addressees in the pagan cult. They are here roundly treated as Gentile Christians, which is in keeping with the composition of the community. The exact sense of the allusion...

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Chapter 13: The Higher Way

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pp. 217-231

Paul follows the Corinthian order of merit in the spiritual gifts, which he will reverse in chap. 14. In doing so he emphasizes prophecy more strongly than speaking with tongues. For the arguments over prophecy are by nature more intellectually determined, and...

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Chapter 14: Tongues and Prophecy

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pp. 232-247

Unlike the Greek theory, Paul's opinion is not that what is said in tongues is unintelligible to the speaker himself. But like the Greeks, he is of the opinion that it can be translated into human language. To be sure, the Pythia speaks, full of the God, to men. The speaker with...

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Chapter 15: The Resurrection of the Dead

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pp. 248-293

More important is the question of content raised by Karl Barth: the question whether, despite the looseness with which the various themes are strung together, there is not a unity of content throughout the whole epistle, namely, that which comes to light in chap. 15; whether...

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Chapter 16: Information and Greetings

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pp. 294-303

The following considerations tell against this division. The absence of the direct address is not a conclusive argument; the material basis for this argument is too narrow: moreover, e.g., in using Phil 3:1, it already presupposes further hypotheses on the part of literary...

Bibliography

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pp. 304-308

Indices

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pp. 309-321

Designer’s Notes

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pp. 322-324

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9781506421353
E-ISBN-10: 1506421350
Print-ISBN-13: 9780800660055
Print-ISBN-10: 0800660056

Page Count: 324
Publication Year: 1975

Series Title: Hermeneia: A Critical and Historical Commentary on the Bible
See more Books in this Series

OCLC Number: 966898801
MUSE Marc Record: Download for 1 Corinthians