Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

The series is designed to be a critical and historical commentary to the Bible without arbitrary limits in size or scope. It will utilize the full range of philological and historical tools, including textual criticism (often slighted in modern commentaries), the...

read more

Foreword to the First German Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiii

The exegesis of the Acts of the Apostles presented here retains the seasoned style of the Handbuch series. This type of exegesis appears to me even today to have maintained its value not only for academic instruction and for the information of...

read more

Foreword to the Second German Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiv

This new edition has been corrected and expanded. I am indebted to the publisher, Dr. honoris causa Hans Georg Siebeck, and his staff, as well as to my assistant, Mr. Wolfgang Hinze, for the painstaking effort that they have given to the production of...

Reference Codes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xxv

read more

Editor’s Note

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xxvi

The English translation of the Acts of the Apostles printed in this Commentary is from the Revised Standard Version, modified in accordance with the exegetical decisions of the commentator. The author's German translation was consulted throughout. Whenever...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxvii-xlviii

It is doubtful that the Pastoral Epistles show knowledge of Acts. There is indeed a certain theological and historical similarity: both operate with a similar conception of tradition, both refer to the laying on of hands and to ordination, and both associate the institution of...

Commentary: Acts of the Apostles

read more

Dedication, Proem (1:1–2)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-4

Since the opening includes at least the suggestion of a proem, Luke is making literary claims and introducing his book as a monograph. The dedication is also in accord with literary custom. The address is shorter than in Luke's Gospel...

read more

Jesus’ Farewell Speech and the Ascension (1:3–11)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-8

Luke's reference to forty days implies a fundamental separation between the period of the appearances and the era of the church. This distinction is important, for example, in the interpretation of Paul's Damascus vision...

read more

The Earliest Congregation (1:12–14)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 9

Contrary to widespread opinion (based especially on Zech 14:4), there is no evidence for a Jewish view that the Messiah would reveal himself on the Mount of...

read more

Choice of a Replacement for Judas (1:15–26)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-12

In this section Luke has skillfully woven together a legendary tradition about the death of Judas and some completely different material concerning the completion of the circle of the Twelve, assigning this combination to...

read more

The Miracle at Pentecost (2:1–13)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-17

These verses are a variant of vs 7. In similar style the narrative moves into an account of the effect upon the audience (cf. 17:32; Corp. Herm. 1.29). The crowd must remain ambivalent, because conversion may come...

read more

The Pentecost Sermon (2:14–36)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-21

The second topic is the introduction of the speech by means of a passage of Scripture, Joel 3:1-5 LXX. The proof in vs 21 depends on the LXX translation, thus the speech was composed in Greek from the beginning...

read more

The Effects of the Speech (2:37–41)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 22

Peter concludes with the announcement of the meaning of the Christ-event for salvation, with the condition...

read more

Summary: The Unity of the Earliest Community (2:42–47)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-24

The summary interrupts the progress of the account and gives the reader some information about the nature of the earliest church. The mention of the "apostles' teaching" puts the stress on the content...

read more

Peter Heals a Lame Man (3:1–10)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-26

The miracle stories of Acts no longer exhibit the strict structure of those found in the Synoptics. Nevertheless, the typical stylistic characteristics can still be recognized: the scene, exposition, the healing...

read more

Peter’s Speech (3:11–26)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-30

The usual structure of the speeches is varied as the proof from Scripture is pushed into the background. Luke supplements the Pentecost speech by setting forth the...

read more

The Arrest of Peter and John and the Examination before the Council (4:1–22)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-33

There are difficulties with this account if it is taken as a historically accurate report. Those problems disappear if we recognize it as a redactional revision of an account which can no longer be reconstructed in its original...

read more

The Prayer of the Congregation (4:23–31)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-35

The number of those assembled is of course not to be inferred from vs 4. When Luke speaks of the congregation as doing something, it is portrayed as a distinct group. The apparent tension between the occasion and...

read more

Summary: The Life of the Congregation (4:32–37)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 36

Here again the inner life and the outer situation of the congregation are portrayed at the same time. For this reason one gets the impression that a secondary insertion has been made in the middle of this section...

read more

Ananias and Sapphira (5:1–11)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-38

This verse is a Lukan explanation. It does appear to contradict the description of the sharing of property as given above, and if it did it would be pre-Lukan. But this is a description from the standpoint of conduct...

read more

Summary: Signs and Wonders (5:12–16)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 39

This third summary supplements earlier ones (cf. 2:43) with the more detailed account of miracles, thus showing that the prayer of 4:30 has been answered. A comparison...

read more

The Apostles’ Arrest, Miraculous Release, and Examination before the Council, including the Advice of Gamaliel (5:17–42)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 40-43

This section has been composed from various accounts which have not been completely unified. We sense a heightening of the miraculous in comparison with chapter 4, but in comparison with 12:3-19 the details are...

read more

The Installation of the Seven Congregational Leaders (6:1–7)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-46

Behind this account lies a piece of tradition which Luke must have had in written form; note the manner in which the "Hellenists" and "Hebrews" are introduced. Up to this point there have been no indications of the coexistence...

read more

The Attack on Stephen (6:8–7:1)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-48

The false witnesses are reminiscent of the trial of Jesus; they are not found in Luke's account of the passion. We might ask in what sense they are "false" witnesses, since their charge appears to be confirmed by...

read more

Stephen’s Speech before the Council (7:2–53)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-58

This verse follows Gen 12:1, though omitting "and your father's house" because in Acts the departure, rather than from Haran, is from Ur, from which Abraham's father must also depart (cf. vs 4). It is not necessary...

read more

The Martyrdom of Stephen and the Outbreak of Persecution (7:54–8:4)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-61

The analysis of 7:54-8:4 is uncertain. It is best to understand vs 54 (which connects with the redactional vs 15 of chap. 6) as the redactional transition to vs 55. Hans Werner Surkau believes that vss 55-57 are also Lukan...

read more

Philip’s Mission in Samaria and the Conversion of Simon Magus (8:5–13)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 62-64

Luke believes that the region of Samaria has only one city-the city of the same name. Whether a source meant a different location here can no longer be determined. On the technical Christian language...

read more

The Annexation of the New Church to the Earliest Congregation and Peter’s Clash with Simon Magus (8:14–25)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-66

In the Lukan portrayal of the Christian mission the establishment of a congregation (in the capital) represents the conversion of that province. The apostles function as a supervisory body. Yet, their authority in the...

read more

The Conversion of an Ethiopian Official (8:26–40)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-69

Note that the carrying out of the order is reported by repeating the verbs; this is biblical style (Gen 43:13-15, etc.). "Ethiopia" was the kingdom of Napata-Meroe, which occupied both the fantasy and politics of that...

read more

The Conversion of Paul: The First Account (9:1–19a)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-73

The intent of the composition is clear: Before the first conversion of a Gentile the agent for the great mission to the Gentiles is prepared, whereby once again the meaning of both the preceding and the following episodes is...

read more

Saul’s Appearance in Damascus and His Escape (9:19b–25)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 74

According to the plan of Acts Paul cannot yet turn to the Gentiles, because the Gentile mission has not yet been sanctioned. On the other hand, he ought not to remain inactive: the effects of his conversion must be...

read more

Saul in Jerusalem (and Tarsus) (9:26–31)

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 75

Luke apparently concluded from the later cooperation of Barnabas and Paul that Barnabas was the intermediary. The account here should not be assimilated to...

read more

Peter Heals Aeneas and Raises Tabitha (9:32–43)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-77

The "instrument" is ready. Now the mission to the Gentiles must get under way, proceeding, naturally, from Jerusalem. These two local legends serve as connecting links. In comparison with the Synoptic miracle stories...

read more

The First Gentile Conversion (through Peter) (10:1–48)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-84

This verse is a literary seam which marks the transition from the vision to the narrative into which Luke has incorporated it (see the analysis above). Luke intends that the narrative action interpret the vision for the...

read more

Peter’s Report in Jerusalem (11:1–18)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-86

The argument assumes the firm connection between baptism and the Spirit. Eduard Schweizer believes that the quotation in vs 16b makes sense only if no water baptism followed, or if it was at least not essential...

read more

The Church Spreads to Antioch: The First Mixed Congregation (11:19–26)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-89

According to Harnack, an Antioch-Jerusalem source lay behind this material.' To it may be assigned 6:1-8:4; 11: 19-30; 12:25( 13:1 )-15:35 (the authority behind this material was Silas). The view of Jeremias is similar...

read more

The Prophecy of Agabus and the Collection for Jerusalem (11:27–30)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-91

Here again the problem of sources arises, and beyond that the question of the relationship of this section to chapter 15. The particulars given here are more concrete than in the preceding section. The discussion here...

read more

The Persecution in Jerusalem; Peter’s Imprisonment and Miraculous Escape (12:1–19)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-95

This comment serves as the backdrop for the story of the miraculous protection of Peter, upon which the accent falls. Luke knows nothing about an execution of James's brother at the same time...

read more

The Terrible Death of the Persecutor (12:20–25)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-97

By its incorporation into this context the originally independent legend receives an additional nuance. Agrippa's death is due not only to his hubris, but to his...

read more

The First Missionary Journey [13-14]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-122

Luke understands this as a "model journey," furnishing the pattern for subsequent missionary activity. It sets forth the problem, which is then solved in chapter 15. In actual fact it replaces the thirteen years...

read more

The Great Missionary Journey [15:36-21:26]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-230

This verse, "But it seemed good to Silas to remain there," is a widely attested addition (CD etc.) which attempts to eliminate the contradiction between vs 33 and vs 40: Paul cannot take Silas with him unless Silas is...

Appendices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-242

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-250

Indices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-285

Designer’s Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 286-288

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF