Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Rarely, if ever, is a book written alone, and there are many to whom I owe thanks. Much of the writing of this book has been supported by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am indebted to Frances Baker for word processing; she...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-16

Disability and suffering have been paired throughout history and remain inseparable companions to this day (Stiker 1999). Suffering always defines a disabled person as a type: one who suffers an affliction, who suffers punishment for some wrongdoing; one who is forced to bear the weight of...

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2. Home Is Where the Heart Is

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pp. 17-40

My neighbor Stewart and I were talking in my office at the university. He was on campus and dropped by to offer me a ride home. Dan MacInnes, a colleague, walked by and, noticing us, came into to my office to say hello. Stewart asked Dan whether he was going to Scotland, as he often did, for...

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3. The Social Location of Suffering

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pp. 41-72

I can remember very clearly the first time the term suffering was used to describe me in relation to my blindness; it was during a genetic ophthalmological examination I had in my early twenties. I now think that the clarity of this memory has something to do with the way in which my blindness...

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4. Coming Face-to-Face with Suffering

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pp. 73-112

As obnoxious as the sensation is to me, I did suffer my blindness and still do. At the beginning, I couldn’t play baseball anymore; I simply couldn’t see the ball well enough. I didn’t like this and I disliked even more “watching” my friends...

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5. The Birth of Disability

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pp. 113-142

As often as I have celebrated the day of my birth, I have never celebrated the birthday of my blindness. No societal convention exists that provides for the celebration of the acquisition of a disability or even for any exact designation of...

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6. Image and Imitation

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pp. 143-176

Contemporary society understands disability as lack and subsequently treats it as lack, particularly the lack of ability, figuring it within the frame of instrumental relations. The lack of the ability to see or to hear or to walk is framed within the...

Notes

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pp. 177-180

References

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pp. 181-188

Index

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pp. 189-194