Cover

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Title, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

THE GERALDINE R. DODGE FOUNDATION and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (MSPCA) paved the way for my research on animal cruelty. In what has now become a land- mark study (Arluke et al. 1999), the foundation and MSPCA enabled me to study the presumed “link” between animal...

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Introduction: Just a Dog

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pp. 1-20

I OBSERVED THE ANIMAL CRUELTY case against Willa in court and overheard disappointed humane agents, who had hoped for a different result, retell the events days later. Two youths brutally beat the dog after accepting the owner’s offer of a few dollars to kill her because she urinated in his house. As the beating went on, an off-duty police officer drove by and intervened. Although it seemed...

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One - Agents: Feigning Authority

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pp. 21-54

PEOPLE DISCOVER who they are by observing the consequences of their actions in the social world. Individuals use this looking-glass self to imagine how they are seen and judged by others, and in this way, they develop self-feelings that tell them who they are (Cooley 1902). Although the looking glass plays a major role in the development of identity in children and adole...

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Two - Adolescents: Appropriating Adulthood

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pp. 55-84

T O THOSE WHO TREASURE ANIMALS and want to protect them, intentional cruelty and extreme neglect are inexplicable crimes that demand some explanation. Unfathomable events, such as these, are just too disturbing to be flippantly dismissed. They cannot happen without a bad reason. While almost everyone wants to know why abusers harm animals, including humane law enforcement...

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Three - Hoarders: Shoring Up Self

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pp. 85-114

WHEN ADOLESCENTS EXPLAIN their prior cruelty, many are dis-tressed by memories they cannot readily excuse. Although they recall their unsavory behavior as a way to “try on” adult identities, this account does not entirely numb whatever guilt or uneasiness they still feel. Others are indifferent, viewing their memories as unimportant matters that neither help nor hurt their self-image, but they too compartmentalize their former abuse by linking ...

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Four - Shelter Workers: Finding Authenticity

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pp. 115-146

HOW DOES ONE BECOME an authentic person? “We would all like to know,” the sociologist Edwin Schur wrote in 1976. “Getting in touch” with one’s “true” or “inner” self preoccupied many people in the 1970s era of personal growth and the awareness movement. The standard litany assumed that a real self or true identity exists and can be discovered if only we “take charge of ourselves”...

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Five - Marketers: Celebrating Community

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pp. 147-182

USUALLY AFTER TRAGEDY destroys a community there is an out- pouring of grief and support from survivors to reestablish social bonds. However, sometimes there are tragedies that have no community to restore a sense of order and meaning after loss of life or property, and the survivors pay for this void (Brison 2001). If there...

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Conclusion: Cruelty Is Good to Think

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pp. 183-204

WHEN CLAUDE LEVI-STRAUSS (1963) observed, “animals are good to think,” meaning that they are food for symbolic thought, he inspired anthropologists to examine how different groups think about animals (Shanklin 1985). While some sought to discover the principles of classification involved in this thinking, and how...

References

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pp. 205-216

Index

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pp. 217-221

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About the Author

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Arnold Arluke is Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at North- eastern University and Senior Scholar at Tufts University Center for Animals and Public Policy....