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Feminism, Foucault, and Embodied Subjectivity
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Addressing central questions in the debate about Foucault’s usefulness for politics, including his rejection of universal norms, his conception of power and power-knowledge, his seemingly contradictory position on subjectivity and his resistance to using identity as a political category, McLaren argues that Foucault employs a conception of embodied subjectivity that is well-suited for feminism. She applies Foucault’s notion of practices of the self to contemporary feminist practices, such as consciousness-raising and autobiography, and concludes that the connection between self-transformation and social transformation that Foucault theorizes as the connection between subjectivity and institutional and social norms is crucial for contemporary feminist theory and politics.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
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  1. CONTENTS
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Chapter 1
  2. pp. 1-18
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  1. Chapter 2
  2. pp. 19-52
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  1. Chapter 3
  2. pp. 53-80
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  1. Chapter 4
  2. pp. 81-116
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  1. Chapter 5
  2. pp. 117-144
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  1. Chapter 6
  2. pp. 145-164
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  1. CONCLUSION
  2. pp. 165-174
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  1. NOTES
  2. pp. 175-208
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  1. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  2. pp. 209-224
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  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 225-230
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