Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraphs

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

Jazz Diasporas reforms and expands a concept that I first touched on in my dissertation, when I recognized the influence of French jazz critics and musicians on the development and dissemination of jazz. At the time jazz scholarship had for the most part ignored this topic. Years later, and with the outcropping of books that build on the foundation Jeffrey Jackson...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I have written much of this book in transit or while settling into different locales. As I travel, it has occurred to me that movement not only reflects the subject of this book but also the process of its writing. During the years that I have mulled over and teased out ideas, I have moved to and from many new spaces and ways of thinking. With each move forward I have had...

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Introduction: Migrating Jazz People and Identities

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pp. 1-28

At ninety-five years old Hal Singer could still seduce with his saxophone. The measured steps to the raised stage . . . the near misses when sitting on his stool . . . the misheard shout out of the next tune . . . nothing could alter his firm hold on the saxophone. On that fifth day of October in 2014 Singer’s saxophone blurted just a bit off sync, though still lilting. But it did...

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1. Performing Jazz Diaspora with Sidney Bechet

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pp. 29-59

I once stumbled on an amazing photograph of Sidney Bechet (fig. 1). Uncredited, undated, it could easily have gone unnoticed in the Charles Delaunay archives of the Bibliothèque nationale de France. The head-and-shoulders shot features a gray-haired Bechet simultaneously playing a clarinet and soprano saxophone. Lights, as if from a nearby street corner...

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2. Jazz at Home in France: French Jazz Musicians on the Warpath to “Authentic” Jazz

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pp. 60-90

“Why do you study jazz in France?” Upon hearing the topic of my research, people inevitably ask this question. My answer: Parisian culture has absorbed jazz to such an extent that it’s hard to imagine when it was ever new and foreign. For example, Paris boasts a year-round attention to jazz via radio stations like TSF Jazz, which broadcasts under the tagline...

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3. Inez Cavanaugh: Creating and Complicating Jazz Community

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pp. 91-124

Her voice haunted me. At first I could only imagine it. On the pages of Le manuel de Saint-Germain-des-Prés Inez Cavanaugh stood—her torso tilted back, her eyes raised upward, her hands spread to the sky while her mouth widened as if singing a full vibrato. As trumpeters backed her and fans smiled, she caused “un petit spectacle” at the Club du Vieux Colombier...

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4. Boris Vian and James Baldwin in Paris: Are We a Blues People, Too?

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pp. 125-156

I once read an essay by Robert O’Meally that changed the game for me, touched me to my very soul. As professor of English and founder of the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University, O’Meally knows his music. He has spent years analyzing the work of visual artist Romare Bearden and Ralph Ellison’s “jazz-shaped” approach...

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5. Kenny Clarke’s Journey between “Black” and “Universal” Music

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pp. 157-200

Sometimes a song seduces you, intrigues you, and takes you on a journey . . .
My journey into the world of universal jazz tripped out its first steps on my hearing of “Box 703: Washington, D.C.” Featured on the December 1961 album Jazz Is Universal, by the Clarke-Boland Big Band...

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CODA: Beyond Color-Blind Narratives: Reading behind the Scenes of Paris Blues

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pp. 201-214

A legato piano-driven melody stumbles along in Ellingtonian fashion as two couples hug in parting at a train station. One couple, an African American man and woman, embrace multiple times as the woman steps onto a parting train. He just can’t let her go and remains on the train step until the very last moment. Though he will reunite with her in just a couple...

Notes

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pp. 215-226

Works Cited

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pp. 227-242

Index

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pp. 243-262