Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Series Page, Dedication

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Prologue: Chaos

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pp. 1-4

Artemio described his deportation as a night filled with uncertainty and fear. Several weeks earlier, after having been stopped for a minor traffic violation and driving without a license outside of Dallas, Texas, Artemio, a Mexican national and migrant to the United States, was arrested.1 He spent two weeks in a county jail, followed by time in a...

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1. Destinations

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pp. 5-25

“You’ve heard, haven’t you, about los deportados [the deportees]? There are many who have returned. It seems you are sending us all back!” Mariela was tidying the house as we spoke. She walked into the courtyard, threw some food to the dogs there, and came back inside. Her joking tone quickly passed...

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2. Alienation

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pp. 26-51

Every weekday at 1:30 p.m. in Tucson, Arizona, seventy migrants appear in federal court, their wrists cuffed to belly chains and their ankles shackled, physical restraint that is—as one defense attorney said—typically reserved for only the most dangerous criminals. The image is striking: rows of primarily young Mexican men wait to be called up in groups of...

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3. Violation

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pp. 52-73

As Dina related what had happened in her rural Mexican town just two weeks earlier, her voice became hushed: “They say nine people were killed, but no one can be certain. They don’t report the deaths of soldiers or narcos [members of drug cartels].” She went on to describe how three of the “civilians” who died that night were children...

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4. Fragmentation

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pp. 74-96

As Federico described the fallout of deportation, he emphasized pain and family separation: “It hurts us to be apart.” He referred to the trial that had ended in removal orders for both him and his wife, Gaby, the only undocumented migrants in the family. Federico focused on how deportation had divided kin: “The judge didn’t understand what family...

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5. Disorientation

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pp. 97-120

For Jaime, who had lived in the United States since he was a toddler, deportation as a teenager was distressing and profoundly disorienting. Jaime was left at the border after his deportation, instructed by his father to head south to his parents’ home community and the town where he himself was born. I first met Jaime when he was in elementary...

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6. Reinventions

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pp. 121-148

Near the end of my extended fieldwork in Mexico, I visited with Rodrigo and Teresa. They were among the first migrants I interviewed about the effects of deportation, and their “removal” was especially perplexing because they had been sent back while attempting to enter the United States with a valid tourist visa. They were returned while...

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Epilogue: Lost

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pp. 149-152

In a conversation about my research on deportation, a friend from the city of Zacatecas—an urban Zacatecano—made an observation that has stayed with me as I have witnessed and tried to make sense of migrants’ experiences of return and being returned. My friend remarked, almost in passing, that the migrants I work with are...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 153-158

When I first began research on deportation in 2008, I assumed that political circumstances would change in the coming years. I thought it was likely that by the time this book went to press it would provide a snapshot of another moment, a dark period in our nation’s history but one replaced by a reasonable approach to immigration reform that...

Notes

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pp. 159-166

Bibliography

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pp. 167-176

Index

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pp. 177-183