Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

Incarcerating the Crisis was conceived as an intervention in the present conjuncture. In this endeavor I have been extraordinarily fortunate to learn from social movements opposing structural racism, neoliberal globalization, gentrification, and mass incarceration across the country with the support of friends and colleagues in these struggles. As this...

read more

Introduction: An Old World Is Dying

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-20

In the epilogue to his memoir No Name in the Street (1972), James Baldwin explained that the old regime in the United States was dying. Baldwin was compelled to intervene as he witnessed the most intensive cycle of struggle in the postwar era. Large-scale protests circulated through city streets, campuses, prisons, factories, and fields across the...

read more

Chapter 1. The Explosion in Watts: The Second Reconstruction and the Cold War Roots of the Carceral State

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 21-42

In August 1965, the California Highway Patrol stopped an unemployed resident of South Central Los Angeles named Marquette Frye and proceeded to beat him. Frye’s assault ignited the fury of the Black working class in Watts. Many took up burning and looting as their form of protest against this particular episode and the more general epidemic of...

read more

Chapter 2. Finally Got the News: Urban Insurgency, Counterinsurgency, and the Crisis of Hegemony in Detroit

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-67

What’s Going On? was Marvin Gaye’s first self-composed album. The songs fused Gaye’s political concerns with the perspectives of the social struggles being waged against racism, class exploitation, police repression, and the U.S. imperialist war in Vietnam. As Detroit’s Black freedom and working-class struggles protested against racial capitalism and...

read more

Chapter 3. The Sound Before the Fury: Attica, Racialized State Violence and the Neoliberal Turn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 68-97

On September 9, 1971, more than twelve hundred prisoners seized hold of the maximum-security Attica state penitentiary in upstate New York. While state police recovered jurisdiction over most of the prison, the prisoners retained control of exercise yard D by holding thirty-nine prison guards and officials as hostages. As television viewers across the...

read more

Chapter 4. Reading the Writing on the Wall: The Los Angeles Uprising and the Carceral City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-115

In March 1991 four white Los Angeles police officers brutally beat Black motorist Rodney King, a Dodger Stadium groundskeeper. A nearby resident, George Holliday, captured the beating on video. Viewed by millions of people, the film of the beating was widely interpreted as evidence of the routine police violence in Black and Latino working-class...

read more

Chapter 5. What’s Going On? Moral Panics and Militarization in Post-Katrina New Orleans

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-133

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina triggered one of the most dramatic unnatural disasters in U.S. history. Rather than a human rights crisis that necessitated a rescue mission, New Orleans was represented as a “war zone.” The city’s police department was directed to stop its rescue mission and focus on security and law and order as Black Hawk...

read more

Chapter 6. Shut ’Em Down: Social Movements Confront Mass Homelessness and Mass Incarceration in Los Angeles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-145

On a cordoned-off block stretching between Fifth and Sixth Streets and Gladys in downtown Los Angeles, which on most days houses a soup kitchen, a vacant lot, and a single-room-occupancy hotel, Chuck D and Public Enemy performed for free at the Operation Skid Row music festival. The festival, which took place on January 15, 2012, the weekend...

read more

Epilogue: The Poetry of the Future

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-154

This book explores how elites have cynically exploited common-sense notions about race and crime in order to win consent to the undoing of the advances of the long civil rights movement and the construction of the neoliberal carceral state. It also examines struggles to transform the common sense and shift popular consciousness. In doing so it follows...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-216

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-254

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-265