Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-viii

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

I am indebted to many people for their support during the research and writing of this book. For their contributions to and comments on material related to the book, I give heartfelt thanks to Mark Auslander, Misty Bastian, Ann Biersteker, Jacob Boersema, Rob Blunt, Manduhai Buyandelger, Neil Carrier, Jennifer Cole, Jean Comaroff , Joanna Davidson, Peter Dreyer...

read more

1. Unsettled

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-47

In late September 2006 prison warders escorted Thomas Cholmondeley (pronounced “CHUM-lee”) into a wood-paneled courtroom in Nairobi, where he pled “not guilty” to a charge of murder. He wore a cream-colored linen suit, blue paisley tie, and handcuffs, and his 6-foot-6-inch frame and pale complexion cut quite a figure in this courtroom largely...

read more

2. Loving the Land

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-83

“Oh god, yeah, I do,” says Paul. We’re sitting outside a café in the town of Nanyuki, on wooden folding chairs with canvas backs. A woman walks quietly over the flagstones to set down a coffee before him, then past a tangle of magenta bougainvillea on her way back to the kitchen area. Paul’s relatives own a ranch here in the Rift Valley’s Laikipia...

read more

3. Guilt

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 84-114

By the time I visited Tom Cholmondeley in the Kamiti Maximum Security Prison outside Nairobi, he had been incarcerated for more than two years, still on remand as his trial dragged on. I hadn’t sought him out, originally, but several of my contacts knew him and had urged me on: “Just go see him. He’ll have a lot to say.” I resisted, for reasons I did not...

read more

4. Conflicted Intimacies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-150

After her husband died in late 2001, Anna Trzebinski headed for the rugged Laikipia landscape, hoping its spare beauty would help her make sense of her solitude. The life of Tonio Trzebinski, a Kenyan-born artist of Polish and British descent, had resembled the grand, colorful gestures that splashed across his canvases. He traveled, partied, and...

read more

5. Linguistic Atonement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-178

When the filing of the second charge of murder against Tom Cholmondeley dominated the headlines after 2006 (see chapter 3), his reputation as a killer of indigent Africans was so toxic that most settler descendants tried to distance themselves from him. Yet he also had a nucleus of supporters who rallied to defend his character. The New York Times, for...

read more

6. The Occult

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-208

The Nairobi blogger “Lost White Kenyan Chick” kept up a stream of commentary in early 2008, when the nation was being shredded by horrifying violence. To outsiders it looked as if so-called ancient tribal hatred had reared its ugly head again after a close presidential election in late 2007. To those in the know, it was clear the election had been...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-224

White Kenyans have a slang term for whites in Africa they perceive as especially retrograde: kaburu. The word refers to an unreconstructed type, possibly Afrikaner, definitely low in intellect and high in racism. In the decades after Kenya’s independence, settler descendants circulated schoolyard jokes hinging on a character named van der Merwe, a...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-260

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-282

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-292