Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Above all I would like to thank the late Tony Subam for his patient, enthusiastic, and thorough assistance throughout the research for this book. His death was a great shock to many, and I miss him greatly. I hope this book helps celebrate his many contributions to Papua New Guinea (PNG) and all those he influenced. Other members of Sanguma who have helped directly include Thomas Komboi, Paul Yabo, and...

Chronology

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pp. ix-xiv

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Chapter 1. Introduction

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pp. 1-15

Indigenous people have been imagining and forging new futures through visual and sonic media ever since gaining access to the tools of production (Wilson and Stewart 2008; Ginsburg and Myers 2006). This book examines a musical aspect of this. What can we learn about postcolonial history, culture, people, and processes of change by analyzing the differences between how people have imagined their nation might sound and how it actually comes to sound? I focus on an approach taken by a group...

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Chapter 2. A Musical Melanesian Way

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pp. 16-40

The constitution of Papua New Guinea (PNG) is very clear about emphasizing respect for ancestral practices and ways in the process of nation making. In a discussion paper titled “Proposal for a Cultural Policy” published by the Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies (IPNGS) in 1976, Narokobi begins by quoting material from the constitution...

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Chapter 3. A Decade in the Sun

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pp. 41-68

In a section of The Melanesian Way discussing the need to “decolonise the mind” to help create a national identity through various institutions, Narokobi (1983) states:

We have also to look beyond the flag, the currency, the airline and the bank for an authentic Melanesian society. We have to look to our “Tumbuna Society” so that we may know ourselves and be ourselves. To be ourselves does not mean stagnation or isolation, it means that we go to..."

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Chapter 4. The Sound of Sanguma

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pp. 69-112

Narokobi, Tjibaou, and Hau’ofa have all expressed the political and social importance of creating modern expressions of a distinctly Melanesian present connected to the past. All have made strong statements about imitation and their perceptions of the threats it poses for quality and comparison.

In a passage calling on Papua New Guineans to take greater control of their destiny, Narokobi (1983) implores...

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Chapter 5. Re-formation in the World Music Era

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pp. 113-138

By the early 1990s, circa-independence optimism had waned, quelled by economic circumstances, rising urban crime, political corruption, and the social and financial impact of civil war in Bougainville. The combination of inadequate infrastructure that developed under colonialism, the neoliberal economic policies of the 1980s and beyond, and the relationships between Papua New Guinea’s (PNG’s) diverse groups and the state inevitably made nation making difficult (Hawksley 2006). The commercial...

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Chapter 6. From Heard Future to Sounding Present

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pp. 139-149

How does the nation sound today? As Askew (2002) has demonstrated, various musics perform the modern nation, and the result can be cacophonous. The styles and practices that most obviously emanate from and have sounded and continue to sound modernity in Papua New Guinea (PNG) since independence are those of local popular music. If a comparison between such music and that of Sanguma serves to inform discussion within the nation, then it is world music we need to turn to in exploring...

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Chapter 7. Coda

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pp. 150-158

Tony Subam died in Port Moresby on Christmas Day 2011, most likely from malaria. He had recently returned from a trip to the Milne Bay Province with Sebastian Miyoni and Thomas Komboi, where they had traveled together and had the opportunity to continue a friendship that had endured and grown for over thirty years. A few days before his death, he had sent me an SMS message hoping to discuss postgraduate possibilities for him and Thomas so that they could continue to contribute to tertiary...

Notes

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pp. 159-164

Bibliography

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pp. 165-172

Index

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pp. 173-184

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About the Author

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pp. 185-186

Denis Crowdy is a senior lecturer in the Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. Before that, he taught music at the University of Papua New Guinea for nine years. His research has explored Papua New Guinean stringband and popular music, and the nature of the music industry in Melanesia and Australia. He is currently working on the impact...