Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page,Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. I-VI

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. VII-VIII

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. IX-XII

I have been writing about the rhetoric of Theodore Roosevelt for quite some time. As a result, I have benefitted from many colleagues’ advice along the way. So, in a real sense, this book is a culmination of the fine insights I have received over the years from incredibly thoughtful people. Two in particular I’d like to mention are Martin J. Medhurst and Mary Stuckey; their work has been very influential in my own writing...

read more

Theodore Roosevelt’s Opening Address at the Governors’ Conference

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-12

Governors of the several States; and Gentlemen:
I welcome you to this Conference at the White House. You have come hither at my request, so that we may join together to consider the question of the conservation and use of the great fundamental sources of wealth of this Nation.
So vital is this question, that for the first time in our history the chief executive officers of the States separately, and of the States together forming the Nation, have met to consider it. It is the chief material question that confronts us, second...

read more

One: Theodore Roosevelt and the Politics of Conservation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-25

During his lifetime, Theodore Roosevelt was shocked at the wholesale destruction of trees, land, animals, and water resources. So he entered the presidency hell-bent on awakening the citizenry to the need for conservation and instituting change in the nation’s environmental policies. Unquestionably, he faced overwhelming opposition from several quarters. The general public seemed disinterested in protecting the environment. 1 For those who did want to protect nature, some saw...

read more

Two: The Environmental and Rhetorical Landscape

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-48

As a historian and a frontiersman, President Roosevelt probably understood that his conservation discourse competed against the immense weight of the social imagination regarding North America’s development. For centuries citizens worshiped the notion of a God-blessed virgin land that belonged to them—an ownership that allowed them unfettered use (and misuse) of the land for survival, profit, and as a means to understand American identity. The interlocking and confusing rhetorical...

read more

Three: Roosevelt and the Modern Rhetorical Presidency

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-62

Senator Mark Hanna’s indictment of Theodore Roosevelt as a “damned cowboy” revealed his concern about the potential for Roosevelt’s recklessness as president. Part of Hanna’s worry stemmed from the deep friendship that he had enjoyed with President McKinley, and the fear that Roosevelt would deviate substantially from his friend’s policies. 1 According to Roosevelt himself, he decided to be quite conservative as a new chief executive, in that he would be beholden to the previous...

read more

Four: The Governors’ Conference

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-100

Throughout his career, Roosevelt tried to educate lawmakers and the public about the need to protect the environment. Despite his presidential initiatives involving “midnight proclamations” and public scourging of “nature fakers,” he recognized that his ideas had not always received sustained, coherent, and celebratory attention by the media.
Years before the Governors’ Conference, President Roosevelt called for scientific management...

read more

Five: Roosevelt’s Rhetorical Legacy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-106

Despite Roosevelt using his rhetorical power to promote various aspects of conservation, his accomplishments regarding the Governors’ Conference might appear, at first glance, checkered. For example, Samuel Hays concluded that the event proved futile. According to him, immediately following the conference, the president asked for Congress to fund the National Conservation Commission (NCC) and its work to inventory the country’s natural resources. “Congress not only denied his request,” Hays wrote...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-122

Select Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-128

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-140

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF