Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-26

Hawaiʻi exists at global crosscurrents between indigeneity and race, homeland and diaspora, nation and globalization, sovereignty and imperialism. This book recognizes this and works to expose how racialization is employed in settler colonial processes to obscure, with the ultimate goal of eliminating, native Hawaiian indigeneity, homeland, nation, and sovereignty. ...

read more

1. Going to the Ocean: Native Pacific Cultural Studies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-47

We are out on the boat off the west side of O‘ahu scuba, free diving, and trolling (my nephew loves line fishing, so we tolerate the trolling). My brother has a small boat, and when my partner and I visit we get the chance to get on the water with my ‘ohana (family)—my brother, his partner, their two kids, and my mom. ...

read more

2. Weaving Analytics and Disrupting Dyads: Unsettling Settler Colonialism in Hawaiʻi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-76

A few years ago I introduced Kanaka Maoli scholar Noenoe K. Silva’s book Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism (2004) for discussion at a feminist theory workshop with about fifty participants from across the country. The format for the workshop has a scholar in the field introduce a text (which everyone has read ahead of time), ...

read more

3. “Melting Pot” versus “Cauldron of Hate”: Cooking Up Racial Discourse in Hawaiʻi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-104

May Day was a very big deal at Kōloa Elementary School in the 1970s. The whole school, parents, families, and friends assembled outside for a half-day ceremony, including the seating of the “Hawaiian court” (a prince, princess, and attendants from each island represented by grades kindergarten to seventh, with the king, queen, and their attendants coming from the eighth-grade class), performances by each class, an address by the principal, and requisite hula by the king and queen. ...

read more

4. Got Race? Rice v. Cayetano and the Racialization of Kanaka Maoli

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-131

Conservative columnist George Will (2000) was not satisfied with the Supreme Court decision in Rice v. Cayetano, even though the decision was seen generally by the Right as a victory: “Hawaii’s racially restricted spending programs, funded partly from general tax revenues, remain in place, and far from being universally recognized as retrograde, liberals aspire to continue staining America with ‘race-conscious’ measures called ‘compensation’ for this or that grievance group.” ...

read more

5. Attacking Trust: Kamehameha Schools Lawsuits, Postracial Discourse, and Victimized Haoles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-152

It’s early September 2003, and I am living in Oakland, California. I get an excited call from my ‘ohana (family). On speaker phone they keep interrupting each other, blurting out details about a march they just participated in: there were tons of people; many had Hawaiian flags; some blew conch shells; it was hot; almost everyone was wearing these red T-shirts; ...

read more

6. Mestiza Consciousness, Kuleana, and Oceanic Borderspaces: Genealogical Rearticulations in Hawaiʻi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-190

Speaking both metaphorically and literally, Hokulani Aikau writes, “The journey through the storm requires that we steer directly into the waves; if we go around them or approach them from the side then we will capsize” (2012, 183). We need the experiential, visceral, and embodied knowledge ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-198

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-220

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-228

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF