Cover

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Title Page, Series info, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Famously reproached in 1706 by the Arnstad consistory for his “curious” manner of playing chorales, the young Johann Sebastian Bach was already well on his way to becoming a “world-famous organist,” according to the 1754 obituary authored jointly by C. P. E. Bach and Johann Friedrich Agricola. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-x

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Bach’s Report on Johann Scheibe’s Organ for St. Paul’s Church, Leipzig: A Reassessment

Lynn Edwards Butler

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pp. 1-15

On Thursday, December 16, 1717, Johann Sebastian Bach, court Capellmeister in Cöthen, diligently examined the organ “partly newly built and partly renovated” by Johann Scheibe for St. Paul’s Church at Leipzig University. At the examination, the university was represented by the then-current rector Carl Otto Rechenberg, ...

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Bach’s Choral-Buch? The Significance of a Manuscript in the Sibley Library

Robin A. Leaver

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pp. 16-38

In September 1936 the Sibley Library at the Eastman School of Music acquired a mid-eighteenth-century manuscript identified on its spine, in a contemporary hand, as “Sebastian Bach’s Choral-Buch.” It is a collection of chorales—melodies with figured bass, meant to accompany singing—given in a sequence similar to that found in many hymnals, ...

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Miscellaneous Organ Trios from Bach’s Leipzig Workshop

George B. Stauffer

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pp. 39-59

One of the great mysteries about the working methods of Johann Sebastian Bach is how the composer created his encyclopedic collections. In some cases we can observe a long period of preparation, when Bach took up a new genre, explored its potential in various works, and then put together a unique, definitive compendium that summarizes its possibilities. ...

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Did J. S. Bach Write Organ Concertos? Apropos the Prehistory of Cantata Movements with Obbligato Organ

Christoph Wolff

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pp. 60-75

Johann Sebastian Bach’s third Leipzig cantata cycle, begun on the first Sunday after Trinity in 1725 and spread over more than two years, contains no fewer than four cantatas with extended opening concerto movements that feature virtuoso organ solo parts. ...

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The Choir Loft as Chamber: Concerted Movements by Bach from the Mid- to Late 1720s

Gregory Butler

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pp. 76-86

Bach’s activities as composer and performer for the Collegium Musicum in Leipzig have always been seen as distinct from those for the principal churches in Leipzig. But at the same time that Bach was engaged in parodying secular vocal compositions, transforming them into church cantatas, ...

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Music from Heaven: An Eighteenth-Century Context for Cantatas with Obbligato Organ

Matthew Cron

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pp. 87-118

Of the almost two hundred surviving church cantatas by Johann Sebastian Bach, eighteen contain movements where the organist steps out of his normal role of continuo player and becomes a concertist. Modern scholarship has considered such compositions primarily from two perspectives: ...

Contributors

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pp. 119-120

General Index

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pp. 121-122

Index of Bach’s Works

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pp. 123-124