Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotation

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

Laurie H. Glimcher

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pp. ix-xviii

In 1898, when Cornell University established its College of Medicine in New York City, both the education and the practice of medicine were not long removed from the primitive Civil War era, when for every three soldiers killed in battle, five more died of disease. ...

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Preface

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pp. xix-xx

Weill Cornell Medicine is a story of continuity and transformation. Initially founded as Cornell University Medical College in 1898, Cornell’s medical school was renamed as Weill Cornell Medical College a century later and rebranded as Weill Cornell Medicine in 2015. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxi-xxii

We would like to thank all our current and past colleagues at Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, and NewYork–Presbyterian, without whose dedication and commitment there would be no history of the medical college. ...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xxiii-xxiv

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1. Origins

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pp. 1-28

Although more than two hundred miles away from Cornell University’s campus in Ithaca, New York City was the most logical place to establish a medical school. Within a few years of Cornell’s founding in 1865, the university had started offering a four-year course in natural history leading to a bachelor of science degree. ...

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2. Clinical Innovation and a Historic Partnership

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pp. 29-47

The last year of World War I was “undoubtedly . . . the most trying in the history of the College,” according to acting dean Walter Niles. The combat overseas had taken its toll, with a third of the teaching staff away on military service and all the departments engaged in war-related activities. ...

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3. A Move to Manhattan’s Upper East Side

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pp. 48-78

One of the most pivotal periods in the history of Cornell University Medical College is also one of the most conflicted. Between 1928 and 1934, the medical college joined with New York Hospital to construct a new medical center on the Upper East Side at the site of its present location, making possible a greater integration of clinical, research, and teaching activities than ever before. ...

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4. The Medical School in Wartime

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pp. 79-100

Dr. William Ladd’s tenure as dean coincided with a period of intense societal change triggered by the Depression and a widespread loss of economic security among the American public. Reverberations were felt at Cornell, as questions regarding the evolving relationship between medicine and society became increasingly pressing. ...

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5. Postwar Boom

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pp. 101-120

The cessation of military hostilities led to an economic boom and renewed prosperity throughout the country, much welcomed after the harsh years of the Depression and war. Postwar economic growth fueled an exponential increase in federal funding for research at medical schools nationwide, enabling them to develop extensive research programs and become highly regarded arms of larger “research universities.”1 ...

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6. The Expansive 1960s

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pp. 121-138

Cornell’s students and physicians had traditionally developed their clinical skills and provided medical care at New York Hospital and other facilities in the city, seeing a wide variety of patients at all socioeconomic levels. These activities placed them squarely in the community, not isolated from society and its concerns. ...

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7. A Decade of Malaise

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pp. 139-166

The term “malaise” is frequently used to describe the 1970s, a decade generally remembered for its economic and political woes. After years of optimism and invigorating postwar growth, the United States was plunged into a deep recession in 1973, beset with skyrocketing inflation and high rates of unemployment. ...

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8. Discord and Disrepair

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pp. 167-193

Public views toward the country’s increasingly costly health care system shifted from vague distrust in the 1970s to overt backlash in the 1980s. The enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965 had greatly expanded access to health care, generating unexpected new sources of revenue for academic medical centers. ...

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9. Renaming and Rebirth

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pp. 194-212

A hundred years after its founding, Cornell University Medical College was reborn as the Weill Cornell Medical College. An extraordinarily generous donation of $100 million from Sanford Weill, chair of the board of overseers, and his wife, Joan, led to the renaming of the medical school in 1998 and the completion of its first strategic plan. ...

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10. Forging Ahead in the Twenty-First Century

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pp. 213-238

On September 11, 2001, news of the attacks on the World Trade Center hit the Upper East Side within minutes. Emergency room staff at NewYork–Presbyterian / Weill Cornell waited anxiously for a flood of injured patients, but tragically, few arrived. ...

Notes

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pp. 239-270

Bibliography

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pp. 271-276

Index

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pp. 277-286