In this Book

Islam in Black America
summary
Many of the most prominent figures in African-American Islam have been dismissed as Muslim heretics and cultists. Focusing on the works of five of these notable figures—Edward W. Blyden, Noble Drew Ali, Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X, and Wallace D. Muhammad—author Edward E. Curtis IV examines the origin and development of modern African-American Islamic thought. Curtis notes that intellectual tensions in African-American Islam parallel those of Islam throughout its history—most notably, whether Islam is a religion for a particular group of people or whether it is a religion for all people. In the African-American context, such tensions reflect the struggle for black liberation and the continuing reconstruction of black identity. Ultimately, Curtis argues, the interplay of particular and universal interpretations of the faith can allow African-American Islam a vision that embraces both a specific group of people and all people.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication Page
  2. pp. iii-v
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Usage
  2. p. xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 1: Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2: Edward Wilmot Blyden (1832–1912) and the Paradox of Islam
  2. pp. 21-43
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 3: Noble Drew Ali (1886–1929) and the Establishment of Black Particularistic Islam
  2. pp. 45-62
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4: Elijah Muhammad (1897–1975) and the Absolutism of Black Particularistic Islam
  2. pp. 63-84
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 5: Islamic Universalism, Black Particularism, and the Dual Identity of Malcolm X (1925–1965)
  2. pp. 85-105
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 6: Wallace D. Muhammad (b. 1933), Sunni Islamic Reform, and the Continuing Problem of Particularism
  2. pp. 107-127
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 7: Toward an Islam for One People and Many
  2. pp. 129-140
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 141-157
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 159-168
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 169-174
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.