Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book represents a true team effort. I owe my interest in France and in the Sinophone world to the students at the University of California, Riverside, and especially the members of the Department of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages. They inspired me to create courses on France and Asia more than a decade ago. Pedagogy led to research, and my work took on a life of its own...

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Introduction to Contemporary Sino-French Cinemas

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pp. 1-28

The Sino-French Co-Production Treaty of 2010 follows up officially on a decade of fruitful cinematic interactions between China and France. Nightingale, a 2013 Sino-French film inspired by French director Philippe Muyl’s movie Butterfly (Papillon, 2002), is the second production under the agreement. Shot in Beijing, Guangxi,1 and Paris, Nightingale reflects the reciprocal nature of the treaty...

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Part One. Franco-Taiwanese Cinema

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pp. 29-30

The first three chapters focus on films helmed by Taiwanese-connected auteurs who connect with France for funding and reach out to French cinema intertextually. The flow between the island formerly known as Formosa and other countries with significant Chinese populations, including the mainland itself, accounts for the hybridity of the directors treated in the three chapters of part 1...

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Chapter 1. The Sino-French as Métissage: Cheng Yu-chieh’s Yang Yang

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pp. 31-71

In Shanghai: The Rise and Fall of a Decadent City 1842–1949, Stella Dong follows her colorful description, quoted here, about Shanghai as an “ugly daughter” with the no less lively personification of the city as a “mongrel princess” who is the “strange fruit of a forced union.”2 Dong’s description of Shanghai epitomizes the negative connotations of mixed parentage. This characterization also reflects...

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Chapter 2. Intertextuality as Métissage in Tsai Ming-liang’s Sino-French Films: What Time Is It There? and Face

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pp. 72-108

Métissage might seem to characterize people only, whereas the word intertextuality may appear to describe texts exclusively. However, the examination of Yang Yang revealed that métissage may be textual as well as racial or ethnic. Aesthetic métissage provides a semantic alternative to textual métissage, with both terms describing hybrid texts. Although intertextuality indeed allows for connections between texts...

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Chapter 3. Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Flight of the Red Balloon as a Sino-French Makeover

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pp. 109-136

Building on chapter 2’s examination of intertextuality in Tsai Ming-liang’s two Sino-French films, What Time Is It There? and Face, the current chapter continues to consider intertextuality’s contributions to the construction of Sino-French cinema. In short, a film reaching out to another film provides the opportunity for the Sinophone to mingle with the Francophone, as one among many types of intertextual...

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Part Two. Franco-Chinese Cinema

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pp. 137-138

The parameters of Taiwanese-connected directors are fuzzy, since the definition of filmmakers as mainlanders often entails oversimplification, as we will see in part 2 of this book. Directors Dai Sijie, Emily Tang Xiaobai, and Jia Zhangke all have complicated relationships with their birthplace, the People’s Republic of China (PRC), particularly in terms of their filmmaking careers, as chapters 4 and 5...

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Chapter 4. Translations of Dai Sijie’s Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress

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pp. 139-159

As the title of Hou’s Flight of the Red Balloon embodies a prior film, Dai Sijie’s Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (Balzac et la Petite Tailleuse chinoise/Xiao caifeng, 2001) inscribes French literature in the nineteenth-century author’s name. These connections reflect accurately the medium of the text that inspires both films. Dai’s adaptation reworks his own eponymous novel, whereas Hou’s makeover pays...

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Chapter 5. Imitating Frenchness in Emily Tang Xiaobai’s Conjugation and Jia Zhangke’s The World

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pp. 160-187

The makeover, a loose type of remake (as we saw in chapter 3), may be viewed as a type of intertextuality. Similarly, adaptation might be considered a form of translation (as we noted in chapter 4). Imitation, the focus of the current chapter, also qualifies as a kind of translation. Like translation, imitation entails variation on an original. Both the concept of translation and that of imitation provide the opportunity...

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Conclusions. Mixing It Up: The Hybridity of the Sino-French

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pp. 188-202

The Sino-French films of this book have invited us to consider the connections between China and Taiwan, on the one hand, and between China and France, on the other, in light of co-productions, representations of France, directors’ transnational mobility, and the global distribution of their films. These films have also encouraged us to look at these nations multidimensionally rather than in the binary...

Notes

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pp. 203-236

Filmography

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pp. 237-240

Bibliography

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pp. 241-258

Index

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pp. 259-272

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About the Author

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pp. 273-276

Michelle E. Bloom is associate professor of French and comparative literature and director of comparative literature at the University of California, Riverside. She received her MA and PhD in comparative literature from Brown University, her Diplôme d’études approfondies (DEA) in recherches cinématographiques et audiovisuelles (film studies) from the Université de Paris III—la Sorbonne Nouvelle...