Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 3-6

Table of Contents

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pp. 7-8

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Living between the Lines

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pp. 9-20

The organization of this volume by Fernand Deligny highlights its fundamental elements. The stylized way in which the book articulates texts, maps, and photographs allows it to stand, in a sense, as the purified essence of the author’s work, especially of the theoretical and practical inventions he produced in the 1980s. The texts bear upon the stakes of his enterprise in the predominant context of the period, namely, psychoanalysis...

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The Arachnean

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pp. 31-114

The random chances of existence have led me to live within a network rather than otherwise, by which I mean in another mode.
A network is a mode of being.
It doesn’t take much – a simple passage from masculine to feminine – for le mode, mode of being or doing, to become la mode, trend or fashion; the word remains the same but the thing evoked is no longer the same thing...

The Island Below, Summer 1969

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pp. 115-128

When the-Human-that-We-Are Is Not There

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pp. 129-130

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That Seeing and Looking at Oneself

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pp. 131-136

In N,1 the object of research: that which persists as prelude to, and despite, S – the subject – and which is (N initial of nous) of a “different nature.” (That of the species that calls itself human.)
In Id: Ideology.
In mi: the micro-ideology of the attempt, network of units.
In u: the units, small sets of presences.
n: initial of nous scratched out from N...

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Acting and the Acted

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pp. 137-144

That there are “individuals” for whom one [on]1 does not exist is unfortunate for them to the extent that one is the matrix of self [se], which is consciousness, on which the identity that is common to all is founded – in other words, that through which each of us is identical to every other, while this common identity also evokes the fact, “for a person, of being a specific individual and capable of being recognized as such without any confusion thanks to the elements that individualize him or her”...

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Art, Borders ... and the Outside

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pp. 145-148

Art ... Borders [les bords].
In the dictionary, we see that the word bord, which used to speak of edges, borders, has ended up indicating the vessel itself. Monter à bord, climb aboard, people say. There remains the sea, which would be the outside.
And we still have to ask whether works of art might not take after flying fish, with an outside that is not of the same nature as the one conferred on us by symbolic domestication and that launches us on what may be called history...

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Card Taken and Map Traced

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pp. 149-154

As it happens, I have been a member of a party, the Communist Party – the French Communist Party, since I am French. I was a member, at various times, between 1933 and 1965, and there is no guarantee that I won’t take the same card back again.
The word carte (card) works well, coming from the word charta, “paper.” It can either be a “small rectangular piece of cardboard with one side bearing a figure” (playing card)...

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The Fulfilled Child

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pp. 155-160

It would seem that, in developed countries today, a considerable wave of comprehension directed at children is expanding. When I use a word, I go to the dictionary and look it up. Comprehension: “the capacity to embrace, via thought, the totality of ideas that a sign represents.” To tell the truth, I hadn’t hoped for as much, despite the fact that any recourse to the dictionary often leads to rich discoveries...

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Those Excessives

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pp. 161-164

Intellectual?
Given that we don’t quite know what this means, better to rely on the dictionary. In the case of intellectuals, it says: “Intelligence has a predominant or excessive role.”
Excess in everything is a flaw. I don’t feel too implicated, myself. I believe I have known some intellectuals, and I have found them very much alike. So we would be dealing with a kind of caste. Every one of them had convictions...

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The Human and the Supernatural

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pp. 165-170

There is the supernatural and there is the human.
Anyone who has lived for a long while in an insane asylum where a good number and variety of individuals and children are confined will have in memory the full spectrum of ritual stances from the various religions, present and past, as if brought to their culmination.
Some see a parody here, since the individuals in question are insane...

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The Charade

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pp. 171-174

The unconscious?
There is psychoanalysis, it’s true.
For me, psychoanalysis is a curiously foreign language. I thought I could learn it, by reading texts written in the only language I know, French. Impossible. The same misadventure had befallen me when I was younger, with English, Latin, Greek, and mathematics. However, this time the texts were written in French, a language I’m rather fond of...

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Freedom without a Name

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pp. 175-182

I have hesitated and I am still hesitating over the very words that make up the title of this text.
I first wrote “freedom without a no.” As usual, I started with a gesture from Janmari, who has been close by for ten years, as autistic as can be; the gesture most often noticed is his hand reaching out toward something. On close examination, it was obvious that the thing in proximity to the extended hand was attractive or repulsive...

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Pretend Not to Notice

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pp. 183-186

Pretend not to notice. Faire semblant de rien. This can be said in French; I’m always afraid of giving the interpreter a hard time [du fil à retordre];1 each language has its locutions and idioms. Joseph Conrad thought that turns of phrase like these formed character; born in Poland, he spent his childhood in France and adopted the English language, feeling more English than the English; having adopted the language...

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The Obligatory and the Fortuitous

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pp. 187-192

To speak of war is to speak of the obligatory, or rather of the obligation to make war, or if not to make it then at least to be in it. What may seem quite surprising is the readiness and ease in which each and every one of us accepts this obligation, whatever the identified subject thinks of war, which, unlike meteorological phenomena, would not come about if men were not led to make it...

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Connivance

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pp. 193-196

A colt about a week old behaves like a miniature stallion with his mother the mare; she shifts a bit and that’s it, and nothing in her attitude suggests that she is in any way offended or bothered. There is nothing surprising in the fact that a week-old colt already manifests the entirety of the ways of being that will be his as he ages and when he is up to it. Is he whole? No more and no less than every being born of a specific species, and in which the species is found, whole...

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The Missing Voice

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pp. 197-200

To be sure, there is the voice [voix] and, to rely on sound alone, there is the path [voie].1
The path is made for going, whereas the voice seems made for speaking.
Thus one might think that it was thanks to the voice that speaking occurred.
Similarly one might think that the path is there and all one has to do is go where it leads.
Following the traced path is thus within the grasp of the humblest of beings...

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When the-Human-that-We-Are Is Not There

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pp. 201-228

This journal is written on the basis of what happens to ME.
M, what is it, or rather, where is it?
It is, at the end of one of Janmari’s reiterated “autistic” journeys, a house found around ten years ago near a fountain. In one room, four walls and a window, a chestnut plank that is more like a workbench than a table.
A few steps away, a workshop has been populated with wander lines, traces of paths followed...

Maps and Legends

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pp. 229-255